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Can You Get Breast Cancer

How Is Breast Cancer Diagnosed

Can you get Breast Cancer when Pregnant/Breast Feeding?| Dr.Adil Hassan| Samrohana | Doctors’ Circle

During your regular physical examination, your doctor will take a thorough personal and family medical history. He or she will also perform and/or order one or more of the following:

  • Breast examination: During the breast exam, the doctor will carefully feel the lump and the tissue around it. Breast cancer usually feels different than benign lumps.
  • Digital mammography: An X-ray test of the breast can give important information about a breast lump. This is an X-ray image of the breast and is digitally recorded into a computer rather than on a film. This is generally the standard of care .
  • Ultrasonography: This test uses sound waves to detect the character of a breast lump whether it is a fluid-filled cyst or a solid mass . This may be performed along with the mammogram.

Based on the results of these tests, your doctor may or may not request a biopsy to get a sample of the breast mass cells or tissue. Biopsies are performed using surgery or needles.

After the sample is removed, it is sent to a lab for testing. A pathologist a doctor who specializes in diagnosing abnormal tissue changes views the sample under a microscope and looks for abnormal cell shapes or growth patterns. When cancer is present, the pathologist can tell what kind of cancer it is and whether it has spread beyond the ducts or lobules .

Does Your Family Health History Put You At Risk

Collect your family health history of breast, ovarian, and other cancers and share this information with your doctor. You can inherit BRCA and other mutations from your mother or your father, so be sure to include information from both sides of your family. Include your close relatives: parents, sisters, brothers, children, grandparents, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, and grandchildren. If you have had breast, ovarian, or other cancers, make sure that your family members know about your diagnosis.

Tell your doctor if you have a personal or family health history of any of the following:

  • Breast cancer, especially at a younger age
  • Triple-negative breast cancer at age 60 or younger in women
  • Cancer in both breasts
  • Breast cancer in a male relative
  • Ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer
  • Pancreatic cancer

Understand Your Family History

Talk with your family members about cancer on both sides of your family.

  • If your mother or sister has had breast or ovarian cancer before the age of 50, its recommended you get screened annually with mammogram and ultrasound, from 10 years prior to their age at diagnosis, but not earlier than 30 years of age.
  • Women at potentially high risk of breast cancer should be referred to a breast specialist for advice on appropriate screening
  • High-risk screening may also include breast MRIs.

While the risk of inherited breast cancer is low, talk about it with your doctor. If you are potentially at high risk, you may be eligible for genetic testing with Genetic Health Service NZ. This assessment would require a referral from your doctor.

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Can Breast Cancer Be Brought On By Stress

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What Causes Breast Cancer Recurrence

Breast Cancer

The goal of cancer treatments is to kill cancer cells. But, cancer cells are tricky. Treatments can reduce tumors so much that tests dont detect their presence. These weakened cells can remain in the body after treatment. Over time, the cells get stronger. They start to grow and multiply again.

Even surgery to remove a cancerous tumor isnt always 100% effective. Cancer cells can move into nearby tissue, lymph nodes or the bloodstream before surgery takes place.

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How Do I Take Care Of My Breasts

The best thing you can do to protect yourself is to be breast aware from the age of 20. This means knowing how your breasts normally look and feel and regularly checking for any unusual changes.

Your breasts may feel heavy or tender before your period, so the best time to check is after your period finishes, once any discomfort has settled down. Show your doctor if you have any unusual symptoms that dont go away after your period, particularly if you can feel a lump, or thickened tissue in your breast, or notice a discharge or any skin or nipple changes. Of course, most changes are not caused by breast cancer but its important to have any new changes properly checked.

Brca1 Gene And Prostate Cancer

Researchers have looked at the BRCA1 gene, which increases the risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The situation with prostate cancer is less clear and some studies have found that it doesnt significantly increase the risk of prostate cancer. We need more research to find out whether it does increase the risk.

A trial is looking at men who have an increased risk of developing prostate cancer because they have faulty BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. The trial is looking at whether a blood test called prostate specific antigen combined with a biopsy, is a good way of picking up prostate cancer early in these men. It is called the IMPACT study.

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What About Other Treatments That I Hear About

When you have cancer you might hear about other ways to treat the cancer or treat your symptoms. These may not always be standard medical treatments. These treatments may be vitamins, herbs, special diets, and other things. You may wonder about these treatments.

Some of these are known to help, but many have not been tested. Some have been shown not to help. A few have even been found to be harmful. Talk to your doctor about anything youre thinking about using, whether its a vitamin, a diet, or anything else.

Do Young Women Have Worse Breast Cancer Outcomes It Seems To Depend On The Cancers Characteristics

Can you still get breast cancer if you test negative for the BRCA gene? – Dr. Nanda Rajaneesh

Breast cancer in women age 40 or younger isnt common about 6% to 7% of all breast cancers in the United States are diagnosed in women in this age group. Still, breast cancer diagnosed in younger women is likely to be more aggressive or metastatic at diagnosis, and women in this age group have worse survival compared to older women.

Researchers wondered if these statistics were really true for all diagnosed younger women, or if outcomes varied based on the characteristics of the breast cancer.

A study suggests that younger women diagnosed with luminal A breast cancer have worse survival compared to older women diagnosed with the same subtype.

The research was published online on August 1, 2016 by the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Read the abstract of Subtype-Dependent Relationship Between Young Age at Diagnosis and Breast Cancer Survival.

Eric Winer, M.D., director of the breast oncology center at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and member of the Breastcancer.org Professional Advisory Board, is one of the studys authors.

Luminal A and luminal B breast cancer are two of the four main molecular subtypes of breast cancer:

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What Are The Types Of Breast Cancer Recurrence

If you develop cancer in the opposite, untreated breast , you receive a new breast cancer diagnosis. This isnt the same as breast cancer recurrence.

When breast cancer returns, it may be:

  • Local: Cancer returns in the same breast or chest area as the original tumor.
  • Regional: Cancer comes back near the original tumor, in lymph nodes in the armpit or collarbone area.
  • Distant: Breast cancer spreads away from the original tumor to the lungs, bones, brain or other parts of the body. This is metastatic cancer, often referred to as stage 4 breast cancer.

Can You Get Breast Cancer After A Mastectomy

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. Just so, how do you check for breast cancer after mastectomy?

Signs and symptoms of local recurrence on the chest wall after a mastectomy may include: One or more painless nodules on or under the skin of your chest wall.Local recurrence

  • A new lump in your breast or irregular area of firmness.
  • Changes to the skin of your breast.
  • Skin inflammation or area of redness.
  • Nipple discharge.
  • One may also ask, what are the chances of breast cancer coming back? The researchers subdivided patients to analyze those with the best prognosis small tumors with less-aggressive properties and no positive lymph nodes. Even these women had appreciable recurrence rates between years five and 20, at about 1 percent per year, or 10 percent over 15 years.

    Likewise, can breast tissue grow back after mastectomy?

    In a medical breakthrough, Australian surgeons have managed to regrow breast tissue for women who have had cancer surgery. They say in one patient, breast tissue was successfully grown from her own fat cells. After undergoing a mastectomy, many women choose to have a breast reconstruction.

    What are the symptoms of breast cancer recurrence?

    A local breast cancer recurrence may lead to any of the following symptoms:

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    What Is A Normal Breast

    No breast is typical. What is normal for you may not be normal for another woman. Most women say their breasts feel lumpy or uneven. The way your breasts look and feel can be affected by getting your period, having children, losing or gaining weight, and taking certain medications. Breasts also tend to change as you age. For more information, see the National Cancer Institutes Breast Changes and Conditions.external icon

    What Is Breast Cancer

    Want to know if you have breast cancer? Heres what to look out for ...

    Breast cancer is a type of cancer that starts in the breast. It starts when cells in the breast begin to grow out of control.

    Breast cancer cells usually form a tumor that can often be seen on an x-ray or felt as a lump. Breast cancer is most common in women, but men can get breast cancer, too.

    Breast cancer cells can spread to other parts of the body and grow there, too. When cancer cells do this, its called metastasis.

    Cancer is always named based on the place where it starts. So even if breast cancer spreads to the bones , its still called breast cancer. Its not called bone cancer unless it starts from cells in the bone.

    The breast

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    What Are The Types Of Breast Cancer

    The most common types of breast cancer are:

    • Infiltrating ductal carcinoma. This cancer starts in the milk ducts of the breast. It then breaks through the wall of the duct and invades the surrounding tissue in the breast. This is the most common form of breast cancer, accounting for 80% of cases.
    • Ductal carcinoma in situ is ductal carcinoma in its earliest stage, or precancerous . In situ refers to the fact that the cancer hasn’t spread beyond its point of origin. In this case, the disease is confined to the milk ducts and has not invaded nearby breast tissue. If untreated, ductal carcinoma in situ may become invasive cancer. It is almost always curable.
    • Infiltrating lobular carcinoma. This cancer begins in the lobules of the breast where breast milk is produced, but has spread to surrounding tissues in the breast. It accounts for 10 to 15% of breast cancers. This cancer can be more difficult to diagnose with mammograms.
    • Lobular carcinoma in situ is a marker for cancer that is only in the lobules of the breast. It isn’t a true cancer, but serves as a marker for the increased risk of developing breast cancer later, possibly in both or either breasts. Thus, it is important for women with lobular carcinoma in situ to have regular clinical breast exams and mammograms.

    Screening For Breast Cancer

    Women aged between 50 and 74 are invited to access free screening mammograms every two years via the BreastScreen Australia Program.

    Women aged 40-49 and 75 and over are also eligible to receive free mammograms, however they do not receive an invitation to attend.

    It is recommended that women with a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer, aged between 40 and 49 or over 75 discuss options with their GP, or contact BreastScreen Australia on 13 20 50.

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    Breast Cancer Survival Rate

    Breast cancer survival rates vary widely based on many factors.

    Two of the most important factors are the type of cancer you have and the stage of the cancer at the time you receive a diagnosis. Other factors that may play a role include your age, gender, and race.

    shows theres a higher mortality rate in non-white people diagnosed with breast cancer compared with white people. One reason for this may be healthcare disparities.

    The good news is breast cancer survival rates are improving.

    According to the ACS , in 1975, the 5-year survival rate for breast cancer in women was 75.2 percent. But for women diagnosed between 2008 and 2014, it was 90.6 percent.

    Five-year survival rates for breast cancer differ depending on stage at diagnosis, ranging from 99 percent for localized, early stage cancers to 27 percent for advanced, metastatic cancers.

    Stage Of Breast Cancer

    Men can get breast cancer, too

    When your breast cancer is diagnosed, the doctors will give it a stage. The stage describes the size of the cancer and how far it has spread.

    Ductal carcinoma in situ is sometimes described as Stage 0. Other stages of breast cancer describe invasive breast cancer .

    • Stage 1 the tumour measures less than 2cm and the lymph nodes in the armpit arent affected. There are no signs that the cancer has spread elsewhere in the body.
    • Stage 2 the tumour measures 2-5cm or the lymph nodes in the armpit are affected, or both. There are no signs that the cancer has spread elsewhere in the body.
    • Stage 3 the tumour measures 2-5cm and may be attached to structures in the breast, such as skin or surrounding tissues. The lymph nodes in the armpit are affected. However, there are no signs that the cancer has spread elsewhere in the body.
    • Stage 4 the tumour is of any size and the cancer has spread to other parts of the body .

    This is a simplified guide. Each stage is divided into further categories: A, B and C. If youre not sure what stage you have, ask your doctor.

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    How Common Is It

    Breast cancer isnt common in women under 40.

    A womans risk of breast cancer throughout her 30s is just 1 in 227, or about 0.4 percent. By age 40 to 50, the risk is roughly 1 in 68, or about 1.5 percent. From age 60 to 70, the chance increases to 1 in 28, or 3.6 percent.

    Out of all types of cancer, though, breast cancer is the most common among U.S. women. A womans risk of developing breast cancer during her lifetime is about 12 percent.

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    Tamoxifen And Raloxifene For Women At High Risk

    Although not commonly thought of as a healthybehavior, taking the prescription drugs tamoxifenand raloxifene can significantly lower the risk ofbreast cancer in woman at high risk of the disease.Approved by the FDA for breast cancer prevention,these powerful drugs can have side effects, sothey arent right for everyone. If you think youreat high risk, talk to your doctor to see if tamoxifen or raloxifene may be right for you.

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    Breast Lumps Or Lumpiness

    Many women find their breasts feel lumpy. Breast tissue naturally has a bumpy texture.

    Some women have more lumpiness in their breasts than others. In most cases, this lumpiness is no cause to worry.

    If the lumpiness can be felt throughout the breast and feels like your other breast, then its likely normal breast tissue.

    Lumps that feel harder or different from the rest of the breast or that feel like a change should be checked. This type of lump may be a sign of breast cancer or a benign breast condition .

    See a health care provider if you:

    • Find a new lump that feels different from the rest of your breast
    • Find a new lump that feels different from your other breast
    • Feel something thats different from what you felt before

    If youve had a benign lump in the past, dont assume a new lump will also be benign. The new lump may not be breast cancer, but its best to make sure.

    Find Out Your Family History

    Breast cancer

    Women with a strong family history of cancer can take special steps to protect themselves, so its important for women to know their family history. You may be at high risk of breast cancer if you have a mother or sister who developed breast or ovarian cancer or if you have multiplefamily members who developed breast, ovarian or prostate cancer. A doctor or genetic counselor can help you understand your family history of the disease.

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    Who Gets Breast Cancer

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women other than skin cancer. Increasing age is the most common risk factor for developing breast cancer, with 66% of breast cancer patients being diagnosed after the age of 55.

    In the US, breast cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in women after lung cancer, and it’s the leading cause of cancer death among women ages 35 to 54. Only 5 to 10% of breast cancers occur in women with a clearly defined genetic predisposition for the disease. The majority of breast cancer cases are “sporadic, meaning there is no definitive gene mutation.

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