Sunday, August 14, 2022
HomeNewsWhat Does Stage 2 Breast Cancer Mean

What Does Stage 2 Breast Cancer Mean

Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Stages

I WAS DIAGNOSED WITH STAGE 2 BREAST CANCER

    Invasive ductal carcinoma stages provide physicians with a uniform way to describe how far a patients cancer may have spread beyond its original location in a milk duct. This information can be helpful when evaluating treatment options, but it is not a prognostic indicator in and of itself. Many factors can influence a patients outcome, so the best source of information for understanding a breast cancer prognosis is always a physician who is familiar with the patients case.

    In general, breast cancer stages are established based on three key variables: the size of a tumor, the extent of lymph node involvement and whether the cancer has spread to other areas of the body. This information may be obtained through a combination of clinical examinations, imaging studies, blood tests, lymph node removal and tissue samples . If, based on the initial test results, a physician believes that the cancer may have spread to other parts of the body, further testing may be ordered, such as a bone scan, positron emission tomography scan or liver function test.

    Invasive ductal carcinoma is usually described through a numeric scale ranging from 1 to 4 . Specifically, the invasive ductal carcinoma stages are:

    If youd like to learn more about invasive ductal carcinoma stages and treatment options, call or complete a new patient registration form online.

    • BROWSE

    What Is Stage Ii

    In stage II, cancer cells have spread or have been found in lymph nodes or axillary lymph nodes, located around the armpit near the breastbone. Like stage I, it’s also separated into two groups, Stage IIA and IIB, depending on how large of a tumor is found and where and how much the cancer cells have spread.

    “We basically need to know how big and if the tumor or cancer cells have spread to any lymph nodes, this will help us understand how and where to treat the patient,” Cruz said. “But as with any stage, even if it’s spread, I tell my patients to remain calm so we can discuss how to fight against the cancer.”

    In stage IIA, if a tumor isn’t found, cancer cells are commonly found in one to three axillary lymph nodes, Cruz said. If there is a tumor, it’s usually not larger than two millimeters and has also spread to the lymph nodes.

    In stage IIB, either a tumor or small cancer cells have spread to the lymph nodes. If it hasn’t spread to the lymph nodes, the tumor is usually larger than five millimeters.

    More Information About The Tnm Staging System

    The T category describes the original tumor:

    • TX means the tumor can’t be assessed.
    • T0 means there isn’t any evidence of the primary tumor.
    • Tis means the cancer is “in situ” .
    • T1, T2, T3, T4: These numbers are based on the size of the tumor and the extent to which it has grown into neighboring breast tissue. The higher the T number, the larger the tumor and/or the more it may have grown into the breast tissue.

    The N category describes whether or not the cancer has reached nearby lymph nodes:

    • NX means the nearby lymph nodes can’t be assessed, for example, if they were previously removed.
    • N0 means nearby lymph nodes do not contain cancer.
    • N1, N2, N3: These numbers are based on the number of lymph nodes involved and how much cancer is found in them. The higher the N number, the greater the extent of the lymph node involvement.

    The M category tells whether or not there is evidence that the cancer has traveled to other parts of the body:

    • MX means metastasis can’t be assessed.
    • M0 means there is no distant metastasis.
    • M1 means that distant metastasis is present.

    You May Like: Brca1 Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    How A Breast Cancers Stage Is Determined

    Your pathology report will include information that is used to calculate the stage of the breast cancer that is, whether it is limited to one area in the breast, or it has spread to healthy tissues inside the breast or to other parts of the body. Your doctor will begin to determine this during surgery to remove the cancer and look at one or more of the underarm lymph nodes, which is where breast cancer tends to travel first. He or she also may order additional blood tests or imaging tests if there is reason to believe the cancer might have spread beyond the breast.

    The breast cancer staging system, called the TNM system, is overseen by the American Joint Committee on Cancer . The AJCC is a group of cancer experts who oversee how cancer is classified and communicated. This is to ensure that all doctors and treatment facilities are describing cancer in a uniform way so that the treatment results of all people can be compared and understood.

    In the past, stage number was calculated based on just three clinical characteristics, T, N, and M:

    • the size of the cancer tumor and whether or not it has grown into nearby tissue
    • whether cancer is in the lymph nodes
    • whether the cancer has spread to other parts of the body beyond the breast

    Numbers or letters after T, N, and M give more details about each characteristic. Higher numbers mean the cancer is more advanced. Jump to more detailed information about the TNM system.

    Jump to a specific breast cancer stage to learn more:

    Questions To Ask A Healthcare Professional

    The Stages of Breast Cancer: What You Need to Know ...

    Here are some questions to ask a healthcare professional about a stage 2 breast cancer diagnosis:

    • Is the cancer stage 2A or 2B? How will this affect the treatment and outlook?
    • If the cancer has spread, where has it spread to, and what does this mean for my treatment and outlook?
    • What other tests might I need?
    • Do I need to talk to more doctors or other healthcare professionals?
    • Are there any special characteristics about the cancer, such as HR and HER2 status, and what do these mean?
    • What are my long-term outlook and estimated chances of survival based on what we know now?
    • How can I obtain a copy of my pathology report?
    • Are there any ways to help cover the costs of diagnosis and treatment?

    Read Also: How To Detect Breast Cancer Early

    What Is Stage 3 Breast Cancer

    Also known as locally advanced breast cancer, the tumor in this stage of breast cancer is more than 2 inches in diameter across and the cancer is extensive in the underarm lymph nodes or has spread to other lymph nodes or tissues near the breast. Stage 3 breast cancer is a more advanced form of invasive breast cancer. At this stage, the cancer cells have usually not spread to more distant sites in the body, but they are present in several axillary lymph nodes. The tumor may also be quite large at this stage, possibly extending to the chest wall or the skin of the breast.

    Stage 3 breast cancer is divided into three categories:

    Stage 3A: One of the following is true:

    • No tumor is found in the breast, but cancer is present in axillary lymph nodes that are attached to either other or other structures, or cancer may be found in the lymph nodes near the breast bone, or
    • The tumor is 2 cm or smaller. Cancer has spread to axillary lymph nodes that are attached to each other or other structures, or cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone, or
    • The tumor is 2 cm to 4 cm in size. Cancer has spread to axillary lymph nodes that are attached to each other or to other structures, or cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near the breast bone, or
    • The tumor is larger than 5 cm. Cancer has spread to axillary lymph nodes that may be attached to each other or to other structures, or cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone.

    Stage 3C:

    What Is Stage 2 Breast Cancer

    Also known as invasive breast cancer, the tumor in this stage measures between 2 cm to 5 cm, or the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes under the arm on the same side as the breast cancer. Stage 2 breast cancer indicates a slightly more advanced form of the disease. At this stage, the cancer cells have spread beyond the original location and into the surrounding breast tissue, and the tumor is larger than in stage 1 disease. However, stage 2 means the cancer has not spread to a distant part of the body.

    At stage 2, a tumor may be detected during a breast self-exam as a hard lump within the breast. Breast self-exams and routine screening are always important and can often lead to early diagnosis, when the cancer is most treatable.

    Stage 2 breast cancer is divided into two categories:

    Stage 2A: One of the following is true:

    • There is no tumor within the breast, but cancer has spread to the axillary lymph nodes, or
    • The tumor in the breast is 2 cm or smaller and cancer has spread to the axillary lymph nodes, or
    • The tumor in the breast measures 2 cm to 5 cm but cancer has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes.

    Stage 2B: One of the following is true:

    • The tumor measures 2 cm to 5 cm and cancer has spread to the axillary lymph nodes, or
    • The tumor is larger than 5 cm but cancer has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes.

    At stage 2, TNM designations help describe the extent of the disease. Most commonly, stage 2 breast cancer is described as:

    Recommended Reading: Breast Cancer Symptoms Nausea

    The Stages Of Breast Cancer And Your Treatment Options

    Compared to most other cancers, staging breast cancer is more complex. And when it comes to treating breast cancer, there isnt a one-size-fits-all approach. Your treatment plan should be created especially for you and be coordinated across specialists and thats where your cancer care team comes in.

    At HealthPartners, we believe cancer treatment and care is best managed by a group of doctors and specialists in whats known as multidisciplinary conferences. This is where breast surgeons, oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and other members of your care team gather to discuss the best treatment sequence for you.

    Below we dive into the treatment options your care team might recommend at various breast cancer stages.

    How Treatment Can Impact Survival Of Early Stage Breast Cancer

    Breast Cancer Type and Stage: What You Need to Know

    In most cases, the earlier breast cancer is first diagnosed and treated, the better the chance of survival. Cancer cells often become more difficult to treat and may develop drug resistance once they spread. The aim of treatment for Stage 1 and 2 breast cancer is to remove the breast cancer, and any other cancer cells that remain in the breast, armpit or other parts of the body but cannot be detected. Having treatment at this stage can also reduce the risk of the cancer coming back.

    Read more:

    Don’t Miss: What Is Hr Positive Breast Cancer

    How Do Tamoxifen Raloxifene Anastrozole And Exemestane Reduce The Risk Of Breast Cancer

    If you are at increased risk for developing breast cancer, four medications tamoxifen , raloxifene , anastrozole , and exemestane may help reduce your risk of developing this disease. These medications act only to reduce the risk of a specific type of breast cancer called estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. This type of breast cancer accounts for about two-thirds of all breast cancers.

    Tamoxifen and raloxifene are in a class of drugs called selective estrogen receptor modulators . These drugs work by blocking the effects of estrogen in breast tissue by attaching to estrogen receptors in breast cells. Because SERMs bind to receptors, estrogen is blocked from binding. Estrogen is the fuel that makes most breast cancer cells grow. Blocking estrogen prevents estrogen from triggering the development of estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer.

    Anastrozole and exemestane are in a class of drugs called aromatase inhibitors . These drugs work by blocking the production of estrogen. Aromatase inhibitors do this by blocking the activity of an enzyme called aromatase, which is needed to make estrogen.

    M Categories For Breast Cancer

    M followed by a 0 or 1 indicates whether the cancer has spread to distant organs — for example, the lungs, liver, or bones.

    M0: No distant spread is found on x-rays or by physical exam.

    cM0: Small numbers of cancer cells are found in blood or bone marrow , or tiny areas of cancer spread are found in lymph nodes away from the underarm, collarbone, or internal mammary areas.

    M1: Cancer has spread to distant organs .

    Also Check: Hormone Negative Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Treating Stage Iii Breast Cancer

    In stage III breast cancer, the tumor is large or growing into nearby tissues , or the cancer has spread to many nearby lymph nodes.

    If you have inflammatory breast cancer: Stage III cancers also include some inflammatory breast cancers that have not spread beyond nearby lymph nodes. Treatment of these cancers can be slightly different from the treatment of other stage III breast cancers. You can find more details in our section about treatment for inflammatory breast cancer.

    There are two main approaches to treating stage III breast cancer:

    Outlook By Hr And Her2 Status

    Tumor size chart: How does tumor size affect breast cancer ...

    Outlook also varies based on tumor characteristics, such as subtype.

    For example, here are the 5-year relative survival rates for different combinations of HR and HER2 status:

    • 92% for HR-positive, HER2-negative cancer
    • 89% for HR-positive, HER2-positive cancer
    • 83% for HR-negative, HER2-positive cancer
    • 77% for HR-negative, HER2-negative cancer

    Don’t Miss: Adjuvant Therapy Breast Cancer

    Treatments For Stage 2 Breast Cancer

      The following are treatment options for ductal carcinoma and lobular carcinoma. Doctors consider stage 2A to be early stage breast cancer. Stage 2B is considered to be locally advanced breast cancer. Your healthcare team will suggest treatments based on your needs and work with you to develop a treatment plan.

      What Is Stage Ii Breast Cancer

      Stage II describes cancer that is in a limited region of the breast but has grown larger. It reflects how many lymph nodes may contain cancer cells. This stage is divided into two subcategories.

      Stage IIA is based on one of the following:

      • Either there is no tumor in the breast or there is a breast tumor up to 20 millimeters , plus cancer has spread to the lymph nodes under the arm.
      • A tumor of 20 to 50 millimeters is present in the breast, but cancer has not spread to the lymph nodes.

      Stage IIB is based on one of these criteria:

      • A tumor of 20 to 50 millimeters is present in the breast, along with cancer that has spread to between one and three nearby lymph nodes.
      • A tumor in the breast is larger than 50 millimeters, but cancer has not spread to any lymph nodes.

      Don’t Miss: What Is Stage 3a Breast Cancer

      What Does The Pain Feel Like When You Have Breast Cancer

      Breast cancer can cause changes in skin cells that lead to feelings of pain, tenderness, and discomfort in the breast. Although breast cancer is often painless, it is important not to ignore any signs or symptoms that could be due to breast cancer. Some people may describe the pain as a burning sensation.

      N Categories For Breast Cancer

      How to Treat Stage II (2) Breast Cancer

      N followed by a number from 0 to 3 indicates whether the cancer has spread to lymph nodes near the breast and, if so, how many lymph nodes are involved.

      Lymph node staging for breast cancer is based on how the nodes look under the microscope, and has changed as technology has improved. Newer methods have made it possible to find smaller and smaller collections of cancer cells, but experts haven’t been sure how much these tiny deposits of cancer cells affect outlook.

      Its not yet clear how much cancer in the lymph node is needed to see a change in outlook or treatment. This is still being studied, but for now, a deposit of cancer cells must contain at least 200 cells or be at least 0.2 mm across for it to change the N stage. An area of cancer spread that is smaller than 0.2 mm doesn’t change the stage, but is recorded with abbreviations that indicate the type of special test used to find the spread.

      If the area of cancer spread is at least 0.2 mm , but still not larger than 2 mm, it is called a micrometastasis . Micrometastases are counted only if there aren’t any larger areas of cancer spread. Areas of cancer spread larger than 2 mm are known to affect outlook and do change the N stage. These larger areas are sometimes called macrometastases, but are more often just called metastases.

      NX: Nearby lymph nodes cannot be assessed .

      N0: Cancer has not spread to nearby lymph nodes.

      N1c: Both N1a and N1b apply.

      N3: Any of the following:

      N3a: either:

      N3b: either:

      Don’t Miss: How To Remove Breast Cancer Naturally

      Stage 1b Breast Cancer Means One Of The Following Descriptions Applies:

      Lymph nodes have cancer evidence with small clusters of cells between the approximate size of a pinprick to the approximate width of a grain of rice .

      AND EITHER No actual tumor is found in the breast.

      OR The tumor is smaller than the approximate size of a peanut .

      Similar to stage 0, breast cancer at this stage is very treatable and survivable. When breast cancer is detected early, and is in the localized stage , the 5-year relative survival rate is 100%.

      What Is Stage 4 Breast Cancer

      Also known as metastatic breast cancer, the cancer in this stage has spread beyond the breast, underarm and internal mammary lymph nodes to other parts of the body near to or distant from the breast. The cancer has spread elsewhere in the body. The affected areas may include the bones, brain, lungs or liver and more than one part of the body may be involved.

      At stage 4, TNM designations help describe the extent of the disease. Higher numbers indicate more extensive disease. Most commonly, stage 4 breast cancer is described as:,

      • T: T1, T2, T3 or T4 depends on the size and/or extent of the primary tumor.
      • N1: Cancer has spread to the lymph nodes.
      • M1: The disease has spread to other sites in the body.

      Recommended Reading: How Likely Am I To Get Breast Cancer

      RELATED ARTICLES

      Popular Articles