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What Happens If I Have Breast Cancer

How Do They Check For Breast Cancer With Implants

How Did I Know I Had Breast Cancer?

Mammography for women with breast implants is described by the American Cancer Society as a challenge, Breast implants are a challenge for mammogram screening.. X-rays used to image the breasts cannot show the breast tissue that lies over or beneath silicone or saline implants because they cannot penetrate them well enough.

Also Check: Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer Symptoms

What Investigations Are Necessary For Staging Breast Cancer

Breast cancer staging almost always involves a bone scan, as breast cancer is highly prone to metastasize to the bones.

During this test, medics inject a small amount of a radioactive substance into the bloodstream, where it eventually collects in the bones. A radiation scanner is then able to detect accumulations of tracer substance in the bones.

If breast cancer spreads beyond the breast, 25% of the time it goes into bones first.

Are There Drawbacks To Tumor Marker Tests For Breast Cancer

While the results of a tumor marker test can be informative, theyre not conclusive. A low result doesnt mean you dont have cancer or are in remission.

For example, CA 15-3 is elevated in less than 50 percent of people with early breast cancer and in 80 percent of people with metastatic breast cancer. This means that theres a significant number of people who receive a normal tumor marker result while still having cancer.

Similarly, a high result doesnt always mean cancer is growing and spreading or that your treatment isnt working. Thats because its possible for various noncancerous conditions to cause elevated levels of some tumor markers.

As such, the American Society of Clinical Oncology doesnt currently recommend the use of tumor markers for screening, diagnosis, or detecting cancer recurrence.

They do note that some tumor marker tests, such as those for CA 15-3/CA 27.29 and CEA, may be used along with other tests to guide treatment decisions in metastatic breast cancer.

Testing for tumor markers can also be expensive. A 2015 study of 39,650 people with early-stage breast cancer found that medical costs for those who had at least one tumor marker test were about 29 percent higher.

Lastly, receiving a high result can be distressing. The additional follow-up testing to determine the cause of the elevated markers can also lead to anxiety.

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Planning Financially For Breast Cancer Treatment

An unexpected cancer diagnosis often comes with a heavy financial burden. Treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation, surgeries, and medications throughout the treatment journey can come as a shock, especially if they turn out to be out-of-pocket expenses. Medical bills can create additional stress in already trying times, so it’s important that patients understand any and all expenses that may arise during breast cancer treatment.

Patients should always contact their insurance company to see what expenses will be covered by insurance and what resources will require funds from elsewhere. Crowdfunding via sites like GoFundMe has become a popular way to cover medical and living expenses throughout the treatment journey, as patients look to the support of their friends, family, and even generous strangers in their community. If a patient is diagnosed with breast cancer after receiving a misdiagnosis, compensation from a successful medical malpractice lawsuit can also help ease the financial stress of growing medical bills.

Inflammatory Breast Cancer Program At Ctca

What Happens When You Have Cervical Cancer

Thats why we developed the CTCA Inflammatory Breast Cancer Program, where our team of breast cancer experts work quickly to properly diagnose and stage each patient’s disease so she can make more informed decisions about her treatment options. Our breast cancer experts collaborate daily, allowing them to reach a diagnosis more efficiently and provide an individualized care plan designed to allow you to start treatment as soon as possible. The team also offers opportunities to enroll qualified patients in carefully selected clinical trials in areas such as immunotherapy and genomically targeted chemotherapy.

If you believe you may be experiencing symptoms of IBC and want to schedule an appointment for diagnostic testing, or chat online with a member of our team.

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What To Do If You Have Breast Cancer

Receiving a breast cancer diagnosis can feel crippling and life-altering for both patients and their families. With 1 in 8 women being diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime, it’s unfortunately a common diagnosis to face. For many women diagnosed with breast cancer, what happens next may be a mystery. Taking time to understand the diagnosis and weigh the options is crucial in receiving the necessary treatment.

Myth: Annual Mammograms Guarantee That Breast Cancer Will Be Found Early

Its certainly normal to breathe a sigh of relief any time your mammogram comes back clean. Most women think, Im good for another year and put breast cancer out of their minds.

Although mammography is a very good screening tool, it isnt foolproof. It can return a false-negative result, meaning that the images look normal even though cancer is present. Its estimated that mammograms miss about 20% of breast cancers at the time of screening. 4 False-negative results tend to be more common in women who have dense breast tissue, which is made up of more glandular and connective tissue than fatty tissue. Younger women are more likely to have dense breasts.

The reality of false negatives explains why a woman can have a normal mammogram result and then get diagnosed with breast cancer a few months later. Some women can have a series of normal mammograms and still be diagnosed with advanced breast cancer. Also, there are cases where breast cancer develops and grows quickly in the year or so after a true negative mammogram.

Mammography does catch most breast cancers, though, and thats why regular screenings are essential. But its also important to pay attention to any changes in your breasts, perform monthly breast self-exams, and have a physical examination of your breasts by a health professional every year.

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What Happens To Cancer Patients Who Choose Not To Receive Chemotherapy

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Answer by David Chan, MD from UCLA, Stanford Oncology Fellowship, on Quora:

Every cancer situation is different. Some cancers are more associated with pain than others. Pancreatic cancer can be particularly bad when it grows into nerves near the back of the pancreas. But Ive had many patients with pancreatic cancer where pain wasnt a problem.

Instead, like many other patients with advanced cancers, they became weaker and more frail as their cancer worsened, then became wheelchair and then bed bound.

Cancers metastatic to bone are often painful but in some cases the discomfort is mild or more severe pain can be relieved with radiation therapy.

There are specialists who assist in managing cancer symptoms.

The most frequent outcome when cancer patients die is that whatever pain they have is controlled with narcotics and or sedatives.

There often comes a point in poorly treatable cancer situations that the treatment is as bad or worse than the disease. Everyone should understand the goals of chemotherapy as well as potential side effects and common complications.

Almost everyone is willing to try chemotherapy if there is a meaningful chance for cure. Many patients decline chemotherapy for low odds of benefit especially if they have gotten very weak or have other symptoms that make their quality of life very poor.

Stage 3 Breast Cancer

I’ve found a lump in my breast – What happens next? The breast diagnostic clinic
  • Stage 3A:
  • The cancer has spread to 49 axillary lymph nodes or has enlarged the internal mammary lymph nodes, and the primary tumor can be any size.
  • Tumors are greater than 5 cm, and the cancer has spread to 13 axillary lymph nodes or any breastbone nodes.
  • Stage 3B: A tumor has invaded the chest wall or skin and may or may not have invaded up to nine lymph nodes.
  • Stage 3C: Cancer is found in 10 or more axillary lymph nodes, lymph nodes near the collarbone, or internal mammary nodes.
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    Breast Cancer Screening & Early Detection

    After the age of 45, women should go for annual mammograms, breast exams, and cancer screenings to be proactive in detecting an abnormality. Catching cancer in its early stages is crucial for increasing a patient’s survival rate. If women are at a high risk due to family history or risk factors such as being overweight or having a previous exposure to chest radiation, they may want to consider scheduling mammograms earlier. If something irregular is detected, doctors may also order a breast ultrasound or a needle biopsy to further inspect the area. Patients should understand the proper protocols for detection, and doctors should communicate recommendations and offer insights about potential concerns.

    If a doctor fails to order age-based cancer screenings, ignores a patient’s symptoms and concerns that may align with a breast cancer diagnosis, or fails to consider previous health conditions and red flags, a patient may not be receiving the standard of care that is to be expected. If a breast cancer diagnosis is delayed, leading to a more invasive breast cancer in its later stages, patients may be eligible to file a breast cancer misdiagnosis lawsuit and be awarded compensation for costly cancer treatments, pain, and suffering.

    Other Types Of Breast Cancer

    Other less common types of breast cancer include invasive lobular breast cancer, which develops in the cells that line the milk-producing lobules, inflammatory breast cancer and Paget’s disease of the breast.

    It’s possible for breast cancer to spread to other parts of the body, usually through the lymph nodes or the bloodstream. If this happens, it’s known as “secondary” or “metastatic” breast cancer.

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    How Is Cancer In Lymph Nodes Found

    Normal lymph nodes are tiny and can be hard to find, but when theres infection, inflammation, or cancer, the nodes can get larger. Those near the bodys surface often get big enough to feel with your fingers, and some can even be seen. But if there are only a few cancer cells in a lymph node, it may look and feel normal. Lymph nodes deep in the body cannot be felt or seen. So doctors may use scans or other imaging tests to look for enlarged nodes that are deep in the body. Often, enlarged lymph nodes near a cancer are assumed to contain cancer.

    The only way to know whether there is cancer in a lymph node is to do a biopsy. Doctors may remove lymph nodes or take samples of one or more nodes using needles. The tissue thats removed is looked at under the microscope by a pathologist to find out if there are cancer cells in it. The pathologist prepares a report, which details what was found. If a node has cancer in it, the report describes what it looks like and how much was seen.

    When a surgeon operates to remove a primary cancer, they may remove one or more of the nearby lymph nodes as well. Removal of one lymph node is considered a biopsy, but when many lymph nodes are removed, its called lymph node dissection. When cancer has spread to lymph nodes, theres a higher risk that the cancer might come back after surgery. This information helps the doctor decide whether more treatment, like chemo,immunotherapy, targeted therapy or radiation, might be needed after surgery.

    History Of Breast Cancer Or Breast Lumps

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    A person who has had breast cancer is more likely to develop it again than a person with no history of the disease.

    Having some types of noncancerous breast lumps increases the risk of developing the cancer later on. Examples include atypical ductal hyperplasia or lobular carcinoma in situ.

    People with a history of breast, ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer should ask their doctors about genetic testing.

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    Rejecting Cancer Treatment: What Are The Consequences

    There have been several studies of people who have refused scientific treatments for cancer. The results have not been good.

    These do not cure cancer

    One of the points Ive tried to emphasize through my contributions to Science-Based Medicine is that every treatment decision requires an evaluation of risks and benefits. No treatment is without some sort of risk. And a decision to decline treatment has its own risks. One of the challenges that I confront regularly as a pharmacist is helping patients understand a medications expected long-term benefits against the risks and side effects of treatment. This dialogue is most challenging with symptomless conditions like high blood pressure, where patients face the prospect of immediate side effects against the potential for long-term benefit. Ones willingness to accept side effects is influenced, in part, by and understanding of, and belief in, the overall goals of therapy. Side effects from blood-pressure medications can be unpleasant. But weighed against the reduced risk of catastrophic events like strokes, drug therapy may be more acceptable. Willingness to accept these tradeoffs varies dramatically by disease, and are strongly influenced by patient-specific factors. In general, the more serious the illness, the greater the willingness to accept the risks of treatment.

    Can I Lower My Risk Of Getting A Second Cancer

    There’s no sure way to prevent all cancers, but there are steps you can take to lower your risk and stay as healthy as possible. Getting the recommended early detection tests, as mentioned above, is one way to do this.

    Its also important to stay away from tobacco products. Smoking increases the risk of many cancers, including some of the second cancers seen after breast cancer.

    To help maintain good health, breast cancer survivors should also:

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    Money And Financial Support

    If you have to reduce or stop work because of your cancer, you may find it difficult to cope financially.

    If you have cancer or you’re caring for someone with cancer, you may be entitled to financial support, for example:

    • if you have a job but can’t work because of your illness, you’re entitled to Statutory Sick Pay from your employer
    • if you don’t have a job and can’t work because of your illness, you may be entitled to Employment and Support Allowance
    • if you’re caring for someone with cancer, you may be entitled to Carers Allowance
    • you may be eligible for other benefits if you have children living at home, or if you have a low household income

    Find out what help is available to you as soon as possible. The social worker at your hospital will be able to give you the information you need.

    Ovarian Ablation Or Suppression

    What happens during radiation therapy for breast cancer?

    In women who haven’t experienced the menopause, oestrogen is produced by the ovaries. Ovarian ablation or suppression stops the ovaries working and producing oestrogen.

    Ablation can be carried out using surgery or radiotherapy. It stops the ovaries working permanently and means you’ll experience the menopause early.

    Ovarian suppression involves using a medication called goserelin, which is a luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonist . Your periods will stop while you’re taking it, although they should start again once your treatment is complete.

    If you’re approaching the menopause , your periods may not start again after you stop taking goserelin.

    Goserelin is taken as an injection once a month and can cause menopausal side effects, including:

    • hot flushes and sweats

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    Inflammatory Breast Cancer Symptoms

    Unlike other breast cancers, inflammatory breast cancer rarely causes breast lumps and may not appear on a mammogram. Inflammatory breast cancer symptoms include:

    • Red, swollen, itchy breast that is tender to the touch
    • The surface of the breast may take on a ridged or pitted appearance, similar to an orange peel
    • Heaviness, burning, or aching in one breast
    • One breast is visibly larger than the other
    • Inverted nipple
    • No mass is felt with a breast self-exam
    • Swollen lymph nodes under the arm and/or above the collarbone
    • Symptoms unresolved after a course of antibiotics

    Unlike other breast cancers, inflammatory breast cancer usually does not cause a distinct lump in the breast. Therefore, a breast self-exam, clinical breast exam, or even a mammogram may not detect inflammatory breast cancer. Ultrasounds may also miss inflammatory breast cancer. However, the changes to the surface of the breast caused by inflammatory breast cancer can be seen with the naked eye.

    Symptoms of inflammatory breast cancer can develop rapidly, and the disease can progress quickly. Any sudden changes in the texture or appearance of the breast should be reported to your doctor immediately.

    For women who are pregnant or breast-feeding, redness, swelling, itchiness and soreness are often signs of a breast infection such as mastitis, which is treatable with antibiotics. If you are not pregnant or nursing and you develop these symptoms, your doctor should test for inflammatory breast cancer.

    Second Opinions For Breast Cancer

    Detecting breast cancer can be a complicated process, so health professionals always encourage patients to undergo different tests and get a second opinion prior to beginning any treatment to ensure an accurate diagnosis. Breast tumors and other abnormalities aren’t always cancerous, so breast imaging tests, like mammograms and breast MRI’s, examine deep breast tissue and are necessary to properly diagnose cancer. A second opinion can also help patients determine the best path for treatment, as different specialists can provide different insights for treatment options. Patients should keep records of all visits and diagnoses to maintain evidence for a malpractice lawsuit if a misdiagnosis occurs.

    Read Also: 4th Stage Breast Cancer Life Expectancy

    Stages Of Breast Cancer: Stage Iiib

    A stage IIIb breast cancer is one in which the tumor may be of any size but it has grown into the chest wall or the skin of the breast. A stage IIIb designation also applies if there is evidence of either

    • axillary lymph node metastasis
    • internal mammary node metastasis

    presenting in such a way as to suggest that total surgical removal is not possible.

    There is a unique type of breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer, that causes the breast to appear red and swollen. This is because the cancer cells block some of the lymphatic vessels. Inflammatory breast cancers tend to have a poorer prognosis and are generally stage IIIb at least.

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