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What If Breast Cancer Spreads To Lymph Nodes

Testing Lymph Nodes For Cancer

What does it mean if breast cancer spreads to the lymph nodes? | Norton Cancer Institute

A swollen lymph node can be felt with your fingertips and sometimes, and if large enough, can be seen. However, there are other areas of the body where lymph nodes are more difficult to find and dont present symptoms on the surface. The only way to confirm a cancer diagnosis in the lymph nodes is through a biopsy.

A biopsy is performed by using a long, thin needle to remove part of the lymph nodes or lymphatic tissue and reviewing it under a microscope to see if there are cancerous cells. The number of cancer cells will determine the course of treatment. There are additional tests to also determine how far cancer has spread and the cancer stage. All of this plays a part in the type, frequency, and outlook of treatment.

If you are wondering, is cancer of the lymph nodes terminal, understand that cancer spreadto the lymph nodes does not automatically determine which stage its in.3 Typically, if its traveled far from its originating tumor source, it could indicate a later stage, though there are several tests that can be performed to get a clearer picture. These include:

Not all of these tests are necessary to confirm cancer staging, but they each help deliver more information to make an accurate diagnosis. Furthermore, cancer staging is assigned at the time of diagnosis but can be restaged following treatment. This is based on if cancer has stopped its growth or metastasized to other areas of the body.

Diagnosing Symptoms Related To Lymph Nodes

When touching an affected area, swollen lymph nodes may feel soft and round, like lumps the size of a pea, peanut or grape. If theyre painful when touched, that may be a sign of inflammation. Since lymph nodes appear in parallelas, for instance, on both sides of the neckyou can feel lymph glands on both sides to see whether they are a normal size on one side and enlarged on the other, which may be a sign of infection.

In determining a diagnosis, its important for doctors to look at other symptoms or factors. Swollen lymph nodes near the ear may indicate an ear infection, for instance. Swollen glands in the neck area near the collarbone, combined with a sore throat and cough, may be a sign of an upper respiratory infection. When multiple regions of lymph nodes are swollen, it may indicate a body-wide disease that needs immediate attention.

Besides reviewing your medical history, doctors may use some of the following methods to diagnose the cause of swollen lymph nodes:

  • Physical examination, feeling with fingers the nodes in the affected area to check their size and whether they feel hard, tender or warm
  • Lab tests, including blood tests to check for suspected underlying conditions

Axillary Lymph Node Dissection

In this procedure, anywhere from about 10 to 40 lymph nodes are removed from the area under the arm and checked for cancer spread. ALND is usually done at the same time as a mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery , but it can be done in a second operation. ALND may be needed:

  • If a previous SLNB has shown 3 or more of the underarm lymph nodes have cancer cells
  • If swollen underarm or collarbone lymph nodes can be felt before surgery or seen on imaging tests and a FNA or core needle biopsy shows cancer
  • If the cancer has grown large enough to extend outside the lymph node
  • If the SLNB is positive for cancer cells after chemotherapy was given to shrink the tumor before surgery

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How Breast Cancer Spreads And Recurs

Breast cancer is frightening enough without the fear that it could travel to other parts of the body. Metastasis is the term for the spread of cancer. About 250,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer and roughly 40,000 will die from the disease each year. When breast cancer is diagnosed in the early stages, many women go on to live cancer-free lives.

Yet for others, the disease is metastatic at the time of diagnosis or later recurs. It’s thought that metastatic disease is responsible for around 66% of the deaths related to breast cancer. How does breast cancer spread or recur?

The Tnm Staging System

Breast Cancer Stages, Stage IV: The cancer has spread far ...

The breast cancer staging system, called the TNM system, is overseen by the American Joint Committee on Cancer . The AJCC is a group of cancer experts who oversee how cancer is classified and communicated. This is to ensure that all doctors and treatment facilities are describing cancer in a uniform way so that the treatment results of all people can be compared and understood.

In the past, stage number was calculated based on just three clinical characteristics, T, N, and M.

The T category describes the original tumor:

  • HER2 status: are the cancer cells making too much of the HER2 protein?

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    Oncotype DX score, if the cancer is estrogen-receptor-positive, HER2-negative, and there is no cancer in the lymph nodes

Adding information about tumor grade, hormone-receptor status, HER2 status, and possibly Oncotype DX test results has made determining the stage of a breast cancer more complex, but also more accurate.

In general, according to experts, the new staging system classifies triple-negative breast cancer at a higher stage and classifies most hormone receptor-positive breast cancer at a lower stage.

You also may see or hear certain words used to describe the stage of the breast cancer:

  • Distant: The cancer is found in other parts of the body as well.

The updated AJCC breast cancer staging guidelines have made determining the stage of a cancer a more complicated but accurate process. So, the characteristics of each stage below are somewhat generalized.

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What Is A Primary Tumor

The primary tumor refers to the original breast tumor. So, any metastases are either secondary tumors, or simply metastatic breast cancer.

Note, when breast cancer spreads to the bones, it is not bone cancer, it is metastatic breast cancer in the bones.

Metastatic describes a breast cancer that has already spread to distant areas and organs of the body. Metastatic cancer is the most advanced stage of breast cancer. Furthermore, the most common sites for breast cancer to metastasize to are the:-

  • bones
  • liver
  • lungs.

Once breast cancer is at this most advanced metastatic stage, the odds of completely curing the breast cancer are quite low. .

The treatment of metastatic breast cancer, after a reasonable effort, will often focus on the quality of life and relieving symptoms rather than a cure.

Local And Regional Recurrence

Breast cancer that comes back in the skin of the breast where the cancer was first removed, or in the operation scar, is known as a local recurrence.

Breast cancer may also come back in the lymph nodes in the armpit, behind the breast bone, or in the lower part of the neck. This is called regional recurrence. If cancer cells are blocking the lymph nodes in the armpit, fluid can build up in the arm causing swelling known as lymphoedema.

Local and regional recurrences are not secondary breast cancer, as the cancer has not spread to another organ in the body.

These recurrences are usually less serious than secondary breast cancer. But you will usually have tests to find out if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

A local or regional recurrence that hasnât spread anywhere else in the body may be treated with surgery, if possible, or with radiotherapy. Your treatment will depend on the treatments you received to remove and treat the primary breast cancer.

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The Lymphatic System And Metastasis

The inherent characteristics of the lymphatic physiology serve as the primary route for tumor cell metastasis. The increasing size of the tumor triggers a rise in the intratumoral interstitial fluid pressure, and interstitial fluid is released as the system attempts to achieve homeostasis. Unlike the vascular vessels, the lymphatic vessels are highly permeable the flow rate is approximately 100500x slower, and coupled with lesser shearing stresses due to vasodilation. Therefore, the lymphatic route is superior in facilitating tumor cell dissemination . Distinguishing between lymphatic endothelial and systemic endothelial cells via immunohistochemical staining has allowed studies to confirm tumor cell dispersion via afferent lymphatics and lymphangiogenesis, and implicates the lymphatics as the most significant metastatic route .

Swollen Lymph Nodes: What Do They Mean

Breast cancer spread to the lymph nodes

Swollen lymph nodes, or swollen glands, are a symptom of many illnessesfrom the common cold to some forms of cancerand a sign that something is wrong in the body. The swelling or enlargement, called lymphadenopathy, occurs in the lymph nodes when theyre filtering cells affected by a condition, such as an infection, injury or cancer. The most common reason lymph nodes swell is because of an infection, particularly viral infections such as a cold. Its much rarer for swollen lymph nodes to be a symptom of a more serious condition such as cancer.

The lymph nodes are likely to swell in one specific region depending on the illness. This will usually occur in the neck, armpits or groin. Less common is when lymph nodes swell in several regions at the same time. That condition may be brought on by infections such as strep throat or mononucleosis, a reaction to certain medicines, an immune system disorder such as rheumatoid arthritis, and forms of cancer such as lymphoma and leukemia.

When lymph node swelling persists and is accompanied by other symptoms, such as fever or night sweats, or when theres no obvious infection, it may be time to seek medical advice or evaluation from a doctor.

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What Is Early Stage Breast Cancer

If you’re diagnosed with early stage breast cancer, find out what to expect and what treatment options are available.

Stage III is locally advanced cancer. It is divided into Stage IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC.

Stage IIIA

Stage IIIA is one of the following:

  • The tumor is no more than 5 centimeters across. The cancer has spread to underarm lymph nodes that are attached to each other or to other structures. Or the cancer may have spread to lymph nodes behind the breastbone.
  • The tumor is more than 5 centimeters across. The cancer has spread to underarm lymph nodes that are either alone or attached to each other or to other structures. Or the cancer may have spread to lymph nodes behind the breastbone.

T0, T1, T2, or T3 N2 M0 or if the tumor is more than 50mm and has spread to 1-2 axillary lymph nodes – T3, N1, M0

Stage IIIB

Stage IIIB is a tumor of any size that has grown into the chest wall or the skin of the breast. It may be associated with swelling of the breast or with nodules in the breast skin:

T4 N0, N1, or N2 M0

Stage IIIC

Stage IIIC is a tumor of any size. It has spread in one of the following ways:

  • The cancer has spread to the lymph nodes behind the breastbone and under the arm.
  • The cancer has spread to the lymph nodes above or below the collarbone.

Any T, N3, M0

Symptoms Of Secondary Breast Cancer

Secondary breast cancer means that a cancer that began in the breast has spread to another part of the body. Secondary cancer can also be called advanced or metastatic cancer.

It might not mean that you have secondary breast cancer if you have the symptoms described below. They can be caused by other conditions.

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How Is A Local Recurrence After Lumpectomy Diagnosed

After a diagnosis of early stage breast cancer, any remaining breast tissue should be evaluated annually with scans .

Most local recurrences within the breast after lumpectomy are detected on routine annual breast imaging, which usually takes the form of mammography and ultrasound, and on occasions MRI.

If you have a local recurrence or new primary breast cancer, you may find symptoms similar to an initial breast cancer. This includes:

  • A new lump in the breast, armpit area or around the collarbone
  • A change in breast size or shape
  • Changes to the nipple, such as sores or crusting, an ulcer or inverted nipple
  • Clear or bloody nipple discharge
  • Changes to the skin including redness, puckering or dimpling
  • Breast tenderness or pain

Once a local recurrence has been diagnosed, we do tests to see whether there are signs of cancer elsewhere in the body. These may include a chest X-ray, CT scan, bone scan or PET scan, and blood tests , then we have to figure out how best to treat the tumour in the breast. Usually in these cases we do a mastectomy, as the prior less drastic surgery and radiation didnt take care of it.

Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy

Breast Cancer Stages, Stage IV: The cancer has spread far ...

In a sentinel lymph node biopsy , the surgeon finds and removes the first lymph node to which acancer is likely to spread . A radioactive substance and/or a blue dye is injected into the tumor, the area around it, or the area around the nipple. Lymph vessels will carry these substances along the same path that the cancer would likely take. The first lymph node the dye or radioactive substance travels to will be the sentinel node.

After the substance has been injected, the sentinel node can be found either by using a special machine to detect radioactivity in the nodes, or by looking for nodes that have turned blue. Sometimes, both methods are used. The surgeon cuts the skin over the lymph node area and removes the node containing the dye or radioactivity.

The few removed lymph nodes are then checked closely in the lab for cancer cells by a pathologist. Sometimes, this is done during the surgery. Because there is a chance that other lymph nodes in the same area will also have cancer if cancer is found in the sentinel lymph node, the surgeon may go ahead with an axillary dissection to remove more lymph nodes while you are still on the operating table. If no cancer cells are seen in the node at the time of the surgery, or if they are not checked by a pathologist at the time of the surgery, they will be examined more closely over the next several days.

Based on the studies that have looked at this, skipping the ALND may be an option for:

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Surgery To Remove Lymph Nodes

Breast cancer can spread to other parts of the body. If it does spread, it usually first spreads to the lymph nodes in the armpit close to the breast. These lymph nodes drain the lymphatic fluid from the breast and arm.

It is important to know if there are cancer cells in the lymph nodes in the armpit and how many. This helps the doctors work out the stage of your cancer and plan the best treatment for you.

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Breast Cancer With Possible Spread To Lymph Nodes In Neck

Hi, I have been really worried. Last year I was diagnosed with BC Her2+ and I had chemo Fec-T and radiotherapy. I started zolendronic acid on Friday and I am still on Herceptin. Yesterday I went for an ultrasound to my neck. The radiologist spoke of finding 3 enlarged lymph nodes I think at the base of my neck. I am so worried it has come back and that prognosis will be poor. Has anyone had anything similar? IN other ways I am feeling well. Thank you. Xx

Hi Sunny-day

Im sorry to hear that the radiologist found some enlarge lymph nodes on your recent ultrasound. Its understandable that youre cconcerned about what these may be and what they may mean given that youve had breast cancer.

I would say that we seem to have a lot of posts here on the forum at the moment from people who have swollen lymph nodes so try to stay positive and remember that there could be a number of reasons other than cancer for this problem.

Have you spoken to your GP or Consultant about these findings? Its certainly worth giving them a call to talk things through and see if they feel further investigation is needed.

Keep in touch and let us know how you get on.

Best wishes,

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Understanding Your Cancer And Treatment

Not all breast cancers are alike. Someone elses experience with their treatment may be completely different from yours. Understanding your type and stage can help make sense of your doctors recommendations. This may help you feel better about your treatment choices.

A big part of cancer treatment is the relationship between you and your oncology team. Here are some things youll want to know about early on so youre well informed about your specific type of breast cancer:

Oncologists meet with cancer patients every day and its their job to see you as a whole person. Express your wants and needs. Rest assured that no question is too insignificant to ask.

When Cancer Goes Beyond Your Breast

Lymph nodes and breast cancer

If your doctor told you that your breast cancer has spread to other parts of your body, it’s at a more advanced stage than if it’s only in your breasts. How far it has spread is one of the things your doctor will consider when they tell you the “stage” of your cancer. It’s considered “metastatic” if it has spread far from your breasts. Every case is different. For some women, it becomes something they live with for a long time. For others, focusing on pain management and quality of life is the main goal.

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