Thursday, August 11, 2022
HomePopularWhat Is The Average Age For Breast Cancer

What Is The Average Age For Breast Cancer

What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Breast Cancer

Secretory Breast Cancer – Definition & Treatment – Dr. Jay K. Harness

There are many different signs and symptoms of breast cancer, so regularly checking your breasts for anything different or new is important.

The earlier breast cancer is diagnosed, the better the chance of successful treatment. Getting to know what your breasts look and feel like normally means its easier to spot any unusual changes and check them with your doctor. Common breast cancer signs and symptoms include:

  • A lump or swelling in the breast, upper chest or armpit. You might feel the lump, but not see it.
  • Changes in the size or shape of the breast
  • A change in skin texture i.e. puckering or dimpling of the skin
  • A change in the colour of the breast – the breast may look red or inflamed
  • Rash, crusting or changes to the nipple
  • Any unusual discharge from either nipple

Almost half of women in the UK do not check their breasts regularly for potential signs of breast cancer.

According to a YouGov survey commissioned by Breast Cancer Now, one in 10 women have never checked their breasts for new or unusual changes. Meanwhile, a fifth of women check their breasts once every six months or less, while 13% do this once a year or less.

Asked what stops or prevents them from checking their breasts more regularly, almost half of women said they forget. This is concerning when most cases of the disease are detected because women have spotted new or unusual changes to their breasts.

Some factors are outside our control, including:

Breast Cancer Stats In Australia

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Australia. Approximately 55 Australians are diagnosed each and every day. That equates to over 20,000 Australians diagnosed with breast cancer each year.

1 in 7 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime.

About 1 in 700 men are diagnosed in their lifetime.

In 2021, over 3000 Australians passed away from breast cancer including 36 males and 3102 females.

Thats 9 Australians a day dying from the disease.

In the last 10 years, breast cancer diagnosis have increased by 36%.

Since the National Breast Cancer Foundation started funding in 1994, the five-year survival rates have improved from 76% to 91%.

Weve come a long way. But theres still progress to be made.

Thats why were committed to funding a broad spectrum of research to help understand risk factors, develop new ways to detect and treat breast cancer, improve quality of life for breast cancer patients, improve treatment outcomes and ultimately save lives.

Our mission: Zero Deaths from breast cancer by 2030.

The risk of a woman being diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime is 1 in 7. The majority of breast cancer cases, about 80%, occur in women over the age of 50.

But breast cancer still occurs in young women, with close to 1000 women under the age of 40 projected to be diagnosed with the disease in 2021.

Breast Cancer Risk Increases Over Time

The older a person gets, the more likely they are to develop breast cancer. In general, children and teens dont get breast cancer. About 90 percent of breast cancer diagnoses occur in women aged 45 or older. Additionally, about half of women with breast cancer are at least 63 years old when they are diagnosed.

According to the NCI, during each decade of life, a womans breast cancer risk increases.

  • A 30-year-old woman has a 0.49 percent chance of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years.
  • A 40-year-old woman has a 1.55 percent chance of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years.
  • A 50-year-old woman has a 2.4 percent chance of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years.
  • A 60-year-old woman has a 3.54 percent chance of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years.
  • A 70-year-old woman has a 4.09 percent chance of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years.

These numbers account for all women across the United States. Many other risk factors affect whether any individual will develop breast cancer, so each persons risk may be higher or lower than what these numbers show. It is also unclear whether these figures are affected by a difference in access to health care resources between individuals.

Don’t Miss: What Is Stage 3a Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer Diagnosis And Survival Rates Over The Last 27 Years

The incidence of breast cancer has risen dramatically over the last 27 years, rising from about 9,827 new cases a year in 1994, to over 20,000 new cases a year in 2021. As a result, 1 in 7 women will now be diagnosed in their lifetime.

From NBCFs inception in 1994, five-year relative survival for breast cancer improved from 76% to 91%. This improvement is a result of research. But despite the improved survival rate, this year around 9 Australians will lose their lives to breast cancer every day. In 2021, there was over 3,000 deaths from breast cancer, including 36 males and 3,102 females.

Unfortunately, despite improved survival rates, the number of deaths from breast cancer each year is still rising. This is being driven by the increase in diagnoses.

The Malm Breast Cancer Database

Breast cancer stats: Pa. above U.S. averages in rates of ...

The study cohort consists of all cases of invasive female breast cancer in Malmö, Sweden, diagnosed between 1 January 1961 and 31 December 1991. They were all treated at the same institution, Malmö University Hospital, and no referrals were made to or from the hospital for patients with breast cancer. All residents in Sweden are registered by a unique 10-digit ID number. Breast cancer patients were identified by review of clinical notes and record-linkage with the Swedish Cancer Registry, forming the basis of the Malmö Breast Cancer Database. This was all completed by one surgeon, who also validated all breast cancer diagnoses by reviewing histological material, X-ray examinations, and medical records . The present study was approved by the regional ethical committee in Lund, Sweden .

Read Also: Is Breast Cancer Curable In The 3 Stage

How Many People Survive Breast Cancer

  • Almost nine in ten of women survive breast cancer for five years or more.
  • Breast cancer survival is improving and has doubled in the past 40 years in the UK due to a combination of improvements in treatment and care, earlier detection through screening and a focus on targets, including faster diagnosis.
  • An estimated 600,000 people are alive in the UK after a diagnosis of breast cancer. This is predicted to rise to 1.2 million in 2030.

For many the overwhelming emotional and physical effects of the disease can be long-lasting.

Every year around 11,500women and 85 men die from breast cancer in the UK thats nearly 1,000 deaths each month, 31 each day or one every 45 minutes.

Breast cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the UK.

Breast cancer is a leading cause of death in women under 50 in the UK.

Fact #: You Can Lower Your Risk Of Breast Cancer

Regular screenings appropriate for your risk level is the number one way to reduce your risk of breast cancer. Other ways to lower your risk are:

Maintain a healthy weight. Data show that weight gain as an adult is linked with a higher rate of breast cancer. Exercise regularly. Reduce alcohol consumption. The ACS recommends no more than one alcoholic drink per day for women and no more than two drinks per day for men.

Learn more about breast cancer care at NewYork-Presbyterian.

Luona Sun, M.D. , is a board-certified breast surgeon at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center and an assistant professor of surgery at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons. She is trained in minimally invasive nipple sparing mastectomy, skin sparing mastectomy, intraoperative radiation therapy, and various frontline localization skills. Dr. Sun is also an active researcher, focusing on rare diagnoses like small cell carcinoma in breast cancer and high-risk lesion management in patients with coexisting cancer. One of her major research interests is in Asian American breast cancer disparities.

Recommended Reading: Is Breast Cancer Curable In The 3 Stage

When To Start Screening

We recommend mammogram screening to start no earlier than age 40 and no later than age 50 for women of average risk for breast cancer, and continue through to at least age 74, says Dr. Andrejeva-Wright. Screening mammography should occur at least once every two years. For women whose screening mammograms show they have dense breasts, an extra testa breast ultrasoundis recommended.

Dr. Andrejeva-Wright says it is important to talk with a health care provider about when you should start getting mammograms, based on your unique health profile, and to make an appointment to see your doctor if you notice any unusual breast changes.

Any time a woman feels a breast mass, which does not go away, while doing a breast self-exam at any age, she should get it checked out, says Dr. Silber.

More than half of the time, women detect breast cancers themselves when they notice an unusual breast change. Whenever there is a new mass or lump, tell your doctorit should be evaluated by a clinical physical examination followed by breast imaging, says Dr. Andrejeva-Wright. Other signs to be aware of include asymmetry of the breasts and nipple changes such as discharge or peeling skin around the nipple.

Says Dr. Andrejeva-Wright, These symptoms dont mean you have breast cancer, but its a reason to seek an opinion from a medical provider.

Read Also: What Are The Early Warning Signs Of Breast Cancer

Age At Diagnosis And Mortality Rates

Coming of Age: Breast Cancer in Seniors

In the past younger women tended to have a poorer prognosis.

One medical study examined 4,453 women with breast cancer over a 30 year period, all treated at the same center. The study showed that in general, women under the age of 40 years had a statistically poorer prognosis.

Furthermore, older ladies, over the age of 80 years at diagnosis also had a poorer prognosis.

Recommended Reading: Harrington Breast Cancer Center Amarillo Tx

Can Breast Cancer In Younger Women Be Prevented

For women with a family history that is suggestive of a hereditary predisposition for breast cancer, a referral for genetic counseling may be appropriate. Identifying such genetic conditions will allow for a more personalized discussion on screening and preventive treatment options. For example, screening in BRCA mutation carriers begins at the age of 25.

Measures that all women can take to reduce breast cancer risk include:

  • Achieving and maintaining ideal body weight
  • Limiting alcohol consumption
  • Getting regular exercise
  • Breastfeeding

That being said, if breast cancer does develop, early detection and prompt treatment can significantly increase a woman’s chances of survival. More than 90% of women whose breast cancer is found in an early stage will survive.

Young women should be counseled on breast awareness and to report any breast changes to their healthcare provider. These changes can include:

Detecting Breast Cancer In Younger Women

While theres no way to predict who will get breast cancer, some factors put women at higher risk at a younger age. Breast cancer risk is higher in women with a family history of breast or ovarian cancers at a young age or who have an Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. Having had radiation therapy in the chest is another important risk to know about.

There are some steps you can take, including discussing your family cancer history with your doctor and taking advantage of genetic testing for BRCA and other genetic mutations, if offered, based on your health and family history.

Through research, we are learning more about cancer, genetics, and risk factors, says Dr. Andrejeva-Wright. Young women should be aware of their family history and keep their doctors updated over time as it changes.

Also, while guidelines no longer call for monthly at-home breast exams, Dr. Andrejeva-Wright urges women of all ages to be breast aware. She advises women to do a breast self-exam at least quarterly and to learn all they can about their risk factors.

Breast awareness entails knowing your family history of breast and other cancers, says Dr. Andrejeva-Wright, It also means knowing any behavioral factors that may increase your risk of developing breast cancer, such as weight gain and alcohol consumption , and doing something about it.

Read Also: How To Cure Breast Cancer With Baking Soda

A Family History Of Breast Cancer

Having someone in your family with breast cancer doesnt automatically mean your own risk is increased. For most people, having a relative with breast cancer does not increase their risk.

However, a small number of women and men have an increased risk of developing breast cancer because they have a significant family history.

Risk For Different Age Groups

Lifetime risks for breast cancer: Factors that you can NOT ...

Although females are more likely to develop breast cancer after they reach the age of 50 years, younger women can also develop this condition.

According to the NCI, the risk that a doctor will diagnose breast cancer in a female in the United States within the next 10 years is:

  • 1 in 227 for those aged 30 years
  • 1 in 68 for those aged 40 years
  • 1 in 42 for those aged 50 years
  • 1 in 28 for those aged 60 years
  • 1 in 26 for those aged 70 years

The also report that of the 437,722 females that doctors diagnosed breast cancer in between 2012 and 2016:

  • 1.9% were aged 2034 years
  • 8.4% were aged 3544 years
  • 20.1% were aged 4455 years
  • 25.6% were aged 5564 years
  • 24.8% were aged 6574 years
  • 13.7% were aged 7584 years
  • 5.6% were aged 84 years+

Age is just one risk factor for developing breast cancer. Some other risk factors that people cannot control include:

Don’t Miss: Chances Of Getting Breast Cancer Twice

Estimated Number Of Deaths In The Us From Breast Cancer

The above bar chart shows the estimated number of female deaths from breast cancer, according to age group, in 2017.

These estimated figures are from the American Cancer Society based on data gathered between 2000 and 2014 from the National Center for Health Statistics and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention .

Due to the statistical methods involved to obtain the projected mortality estimates, this graph should not be compared with other mortality rates.

Patient Characteristics With Reference To Age At Diagnosis

Clinical factors and tumor characteristics of the six age groups are shown in Table . Distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis was more common with increasing age. There was considerably more missing data for the oldest age category concerning axillary lymph node status. It was more common for older women to have been regarded as unsuitable for surgery, and it was also less common for these women to have undergone an axillary dissection.

Table 1 Distribution of age at diagnosis in relation to patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, and surgical treatment

Recommended Reading: How To Cure Breast Cancer With Baking Soda

Breast Cancer Diagnosed During Or After Pregnancy

Being pregnant at the time of diagnosis of breast cancer has been associated with a worse outcome. In one study of 797 such cases, compared with 4,177 non-pregnancy-associated breast cancer controls, women diagnosed while pregnant had larger, more advanced tumors, a greater incidence of receptor-negative tumors, and a higher death rate . A smaller study found no association between pregnancy and increased mortality. In contrast, pregnancy and childbirth following a diagnosis of breast cancer do not increase mortality, and actually may improve survival. One study found that 438 women age < 45 years at diagnosis, who delivered a child 10 or more months following a diagnosis of breast cancer, had a decreased relative risk of death , compared to women who did not bear children following diagnosis. Women who were pregnant at the time they were diagnosed had a mortality rate similar to the latter group. This suggests that childbirth following breast cancer diagnosis does not increase mortality.

A Note Of Caution For Breast Cancer Mortality Rates

Early Onset Breast Cancer: Risk Reduction and Warning Signs

The up-dated posts that I have recently made on breast cancer survival statistics and incidence rates are a guide only. The facts, figures, graphs and bar charts are derived from statistics for large amounts of women over many years.

It can NOT be stressed enough that each case is individual and there are many complex and interlinked factors that affect the prognosis and outcome.

General mortality rates do not reflect the many factors that affect prognosis. These include the stage of breast cancer at diagnosis, type of tumor, age at diagnosis, ethnicity and more.

For a full discussion on these issues see our recent post, Breast Cancer Survival Rates.

Read Also: Does Getting Hit In The Breast Cause Cancer

Global Breast Cancer Mortality Rates

In 2011 over 508,000 women died of breast cancer worldwide according to the World Health Organization .

Although breast cancer is often associated with the developed world almost half of all breast cancer cases and 58% of deaths occur in less developed countries.

In 2012 the top 20 countries for breast cancer survival rates are in the table below taken from World Cancer Research Fund International . The ranking of the countries is based upon the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer who were alive 5 years later. Figures are based on breast cancer survivors per 100,000 adult women.

The Social Dimension Of Age

Causal paradigms for cancer typically categorize age along with gender, race, and ethnicity as individual characteristics that are not amenable to intervention. Just as research has shown a lack of precision in various racial and ethnic categories, a great deal of heterogeneity can exist within any age category. In addition, the experience of age is subject to social and cultural influences. Although the challenges of examining differences by race and ethnicity without contributing to societal racism has been noted previously,,, the influence of stereotypes and prejudice based on age has received far less attention.,

Read Also: What Is The Youngest Age You Can Get Breast Cancer

RELATED ARTICLES

Popular Articles