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What Is The Youngest Age To Have Breast Cancer

Noticing Changes To Your Breasts

Why Do Black Women Have a Higher Risk of Breast Cancer At a Young Age?

The ACS no longer recommends regular breast self-exams, since theres no evidence that they help reduce breast cancer deaths.

However, knowing how your breasts normally look and feel can help you identify any changes early on. Take notice of the following:

Once youve established a baseline for how your breasts look and feel, itll be easier to identify any changes in the future.

If you do notice any changes, or if anything causes you worry, let your doctor know. They can determine if theres cause for concern.

Its common to see asymmetry in breast size, which can be normal.

A note on breast exams

The American Cancer Society no longer recommends regular clinical breast exams or breast self-exams. Theres little evidence that these exams help reduce deaths from breast cancer in women at average risk for the condition.

However, these exams may still be performed in certain scenarios.

For instance, some healthcare professionals may choose to perform clinical breast exams and counsel women on risk and early detection, in particular those at a higher-than-average risk for cancer. In addition, some women might prefer to use routine breast self-exams as a way to track possible changes to their breasts.

Take Action To Change Young Adult Breast Cancer Statistics

When all young adults affected by breast cancer work together, we can raise awareness, improve our representation in research and make each other stronger. We are dedicated to these goals, working to turn our unique challenges into opportunities for shared success. Join the movement! Become an advocate for young women with breast cancer.

Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines

MedStar Health doctors and the American Cancer Society recommend different screening guidelines based on the following risk categories:

Average Risk

  • Examination by a trained professional every three years
  • Age 35 to 39
  • Examination by a trained professional every three years
  • Age 40 and over
  • Annual examination by a trained professional
  • Annual mammogram
  • Average risk may increase based on:

    • Personal history of breast abnormalities
    • Current age
    • Breast cancer history of close relatives
    • Whether a woman has had a breast biopsy
    • Obesity
    • Physical inactivity
    • Race

    High-risk: Family history of disease

    • Women should be aware of any changes in their breasts. Monthly breast self-examination beginning at 20 years old is optional, but highly recommended.
    • Clinical examination every six months starting 10 years before the age at which the youngest family member was diagnosed with the disease.
    • Annual mammography starting 10 years before the age of the youngest family member with the disease .
    • Consider annual MRI .

    High-risk: Diagnosis of benign breast disease or breast cancer confined to the milk duct or lobule

    • Women should be aware of any changes in their breasts. Monthly self-examination beginning at 20 years old is optional, but highly recommended.
    • Clinical examination every six months beginning at time of diagnosis.
    • Annual mammography beginning at the time of diagnosis.
    • Consider annual MRI .

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    How Often Does Stage 1 Breast Cancer Come Back After Treatment

    If stage 1 cancer is treated comprehensively, it rarely comes back. A new, unrelated breast cancer is more likely to emerge after stage 1 breast cancer is treated than a recurrence. Your healthcare provider will recommend a surveillance schedule for you so that new breast cancer or a recurrence can be identified and treated as quickly as possible.

    Living With Breast Cancer

    Young Mom vs. Breast Cancer

    Dealing with breast cancer can be very hard for a woman and her family. A woman who has breast cancer surgery or treatment may not feel well for a while. She may be depressed if she had her breast removed. If a woman needs chemotherapy, she may lose her hair and she may feel sick to her stomach. She also may worry that the cancer will return and she’ll get sick again.

    The good news is that many times, especially if a lump is caught early, women with breast cancer go on to live full, healthy lives after treatment. Some join support groups so they can talk to other women with breast cancer who are feeling the same emotions.

    There are even groups that kids or other family members can join to talk about their feelings when someone they love has breast cancer. Find a trusted adult to talk with if you’re worried about a loved one.

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    Why Do People Get Breast Cancer

    Any woman can get breast cancer, but these things can make some women more likely to get it:

    • Family history: A woman whose mother, sister, aunt, or daughter has had breast cancer is more likely to get it.
    • Age: As women get older, they are more at risk for breast cancer. Teens as well as women in their twenties and thirties are less likely to get breast cancer.
    • Diet and lifestyle choices: Women who smoke, eat high-fat diets, drink alcohol, and don’t get enough exercise may be more at risk for developing breast cancer.

    Soft Tissue And Bone Cancers

    Sarcomas are cancers that start in connective tissues such as muscles, bones, or fat cells. There are 2 main types of sarcoma:

    • Soft tissue sarcomas
    • Bone sarcomas

    Sarcomas can develop at any age, but some types occur most often in older teens and young adults.

    Soft tissue sarcomas: These cancers can start in any part of the body, but they often develop in the arms or legs. Rhabdomyosarcoma, a cancer that starts in cells that normally develop into skeletal muscles, is most common in children younger than 10, but it can also develop in teens and young adults. Most other types of soft tissue sarcomas become more common as people age. Symptoms depend on where the sarcoma starts, and can include lumps , swelling, or bowel problems.

    For more information, see Soft Tissue Sarcoma;and Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Bone sarcomas: The 2 most common types of bone cancer,osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma, are most common in teens, but they can also develop in young adults. They often cause bone pain that gets worse at night or with activity. They can also cause swelling in the area around the bone.

    Osteosarcoma usually starts near the ends of the leg or arm bones. The most common places for Ewing sarcoma to start are the pelvic bones, the bones of the chest wall , or in the middle of the leg bones.

    For more information, see Osteosarcoma and Ewing Family of Tumors.

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    How Common Is Breast Cancer In Teens

    Even in young adult women, the odds of developing breast cancer are very low. Less than 5 percent of breast cancers occur in women under 40. At age 30, the risk of developing breast cancer is 0.44 percent. There are less than 25 cases of breast cancer per year in women in each age group under 30. Among teenagers, the figure is close to zero.

    These statistics mean that issues with the breasts are almost certainly due to other causes and these are often just normal development.

    Other reasons a teenager might develop a lump in her breast include:

    When You Can’t Find Your Family History

    Why Are So Many Young Women Getting Breast Cancer?

    While many women already know if their mother, sister, or daughter have had breast cancer, you might not have this information.

    If your close family members passed away at a young age, if some of them didn’t have access to health care , if you were adopted, or if members of your family have been otherwise separated, you might not know which illnesses run in your family.

    While family history is important information, breast cancer screenings are the most important tools for early detection, whether or not you have a family history of the disease.

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    Treatment Of Breast Cancer In Teens

    Doctors treat secretory adenocarcinoma by surgically cutting out the cancer while sparing as much breast tissue as possible.

    Doctors consider chemotherapy and radiation on a case-by-case basis. The risks these treatments pose to young, developing bodies may outweigh the benefits.

    Depending on the type of therapy and how long it lasts, it can affect your fertility and increase your chances of other cancers.

    You can still breastfeed after breast or nipple surgery. However, some people may produce less milk than others.

    Collecting Your Family History

    Your mother is an important figure in your cancer risk profile if she has or has had breast cancer. But, given the above, it’s also helpful to find out if cancer has affected other family members, including grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins. Don’t assume that you know this informationit’s worth specifically asking.

    For the purpose of building your own family history, you need to know:

    • What type of cancer a relative had
    • What age they were diagnosed
    • If they were cured, still living with cancer, or have died

    Other details, such as the grade, type, and stage of cancer are not as important for you to know. If you develop breast cancer, your medical team will identify your own grade, type, and stage rather than relying on your family history.

    If your mother or father are alive and able to share your family’s background with you, filling out the Cancer Family History Questionnaire that was created by the American Society of Clinical Oncology can help you keep track of the information. Once you gather your family history, it would be useful to keep that record for yourself and for other family members who share some of your family medical history.

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    What Is The Average American Womans Risk Of Being Diagnosed With Breast Cancer At Different Ages

    Many women are more interested in the risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer at specific ages or over specific time periods than in the risk of being diagnosed at some point during their lifetime. Estimates by decade of life are also less affected by changes in incidence and mortality rates than longer-term estimates. The SEER report estimates the risk of developing breast cancer in 10-year age intervals . According to the current report, the risk that a woman will be diagnosed with breast cancer during the next 10 years, starting at the following ages, is as follows:;

    • Age 30 . . . . . . ;0.49%
    • Age 40 . . . . . . ;1.55%
    • Age 50 . . . . . . ;2.40%
    • Age 60 . . . . . . ;3.54%
    • Age 70 . . . . . . ;4.09%

    These risks are averages for the whole population. An individual womans breast cancer risk may be higher or lower depending on known factors, as well as on factors that are not yet fully understood. To calculate an individual womans estimated breast cancer risk, health professionals can use the Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool, which takes into account several known breast cancer risk factors.;

    Guidelines For Elective Surgical Options

    110 best images about Breast Cancer on Pinterest

    Women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations face a significant risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Prophylactic removal of the fallopian tubes and ovaries is recommended by about age 40.; Many women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations will also elect to have their breasts removed. Nipple-sparing mastectomy is an effective option for these women.;

    Making the decision to have an elective preventive double mastectomy and removal of the ovaries is personal and should be based on many life factors. You must balance where you are in your childbearing years, what your future choices may be, and whether you would prefer to follow a rigorous screening schedule instead of making such a life-altering choice.

    Whatever your decision, we encourage you to make an informed choice. If you do elect to have a preventive double mastectomy, our breast specialists will guide you in the appropriate breast surgery reconstruction to help restore your body image after treatment.

    If you are interested in discussing ovary removal surgery , we will refer you to one of our gynecological oncologists.

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    What Clinical Trials Are Available For Women With Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    NCI sponsors clinical trials of new treatments for all types of cancer, as well as trials that test better ways to use existing treatments. Participation in clinical trials is an option for many patients with inflammatory breast cancer, and all patients with this disease are encouraged to consider treatment in a clinical trial.

    Descriptions of ongoing clinical trials for individuals with inflammatory breast cancer can be accessed by searching;NCIs list of cancer clinical trials. NCIs list of cancer clinical trials includes all NCI-supported clinical trials that are taking place across the United States and Canada, including the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. For information about how to search the list, see Help Finding NCI-Supported Clinical Trials.

    People interested in taking part in a clinical trial should talk with their doctor. Information about clinical trials is available from NCIs Cancer Information Service;at 18004CANCER ;and in the NCI booklet Taking Part in Cancer Treatment Research Studies. Additional information about clinical trials is available online.

    Selected References
  • Anderson WF, Schairer C, Chen BE, Hance KW, Levine PH. Epidemiology of inflammatory breast cancer . Breast Diseases 2005; 22:9-23.

  • Should You Talk To Your Doctor About Breast Cancer

    Understanding breast cancer risk factors, knowing your personal risk of developing breast cancer, and recognizing the signs and symptoms of breast cancer can help women seek the care that they need, when they need it.

    Take our Breast Cancer Risk Quiz to learn more about your personal risk. The quiz takes less than one minute to complete.

    If you are 40 years or older, schedule a mammogram. The Breast Center along with The American Medical Association, The American College of Radiology, the American Cancer Society, the Society of Breast Imaging, and the National Cancer Institute recommend that women start getting a screening mammogram every year starting at age 40.

    You dont have to wait until youre 40 to talk to your doctor about breast cancer, though. Meet with the specialists at the Breast Center if you have questions or concerns about breast cancer or breast health. Request an appointment online or call 479-442-6266.

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    Symptoms Of Breast Cancer

    Breast cancer can have several symptoms, but the first noticeable symptom is usually a lump or area of thickened breast tissue.

    Most breast lumps are not cancerous, but it’s always best to have them checked by a doctor.

    You should also see a GP if you notice any of these symptoms:

    • a change in the size or shape of one or both breasts
    • discharge from either of your nipples, which may be streaked with blood
    • a lump or swelling in either of your armpits
    • dimpling on the skin of your breasts
    • a rash on or around your nipple
    • a change in the appearance of your nipple, such as becoming sunken into your breast

    Breast pain is not usually a symptom of breast cancer.

    Find out more about the symptoms of breast cancer.

    Cancers Of The Female Genital Tract

    Can Young Women Develop Inflammatory Breast Cancer?

    Cervical cancer tends to occur in midlife. Most often it is found in women younger than 50. It rarely occurs in women younger than 20. Most cervical cancers can be found early, or even prevented, with screening tests. Vaccines against HPV, the virus linked to most cervical cancers, can also help prevent it. The most common symptom of cervical cancer is abnormal vaginal bleeding.

    Overall, ovarian cancer is much more common in older women than in women younger than 40. But some less common types of ovarian cancers, known as germ cell tumors, are more common in teens and young women than in older women. Early ovarian cancer usually does not cause symptoms, but some women might feel full quickly when eating or they might have abnormal bloating, belly pain, or urinary symptoms. Women who have any of these symptoms lasting more than a few weeks should see their doctor.

    For more information, see Cervical Cancer and Ovarian Cancer.

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    Teen Breast Cancer Causes And Symptoms

    There are times that teen girls may discover a small lump in their breast, but it is almost always benign and typically triggered by normal hormonal fluctuations. These noncancerous lumps usually go away on their own. However, there are symptoms a doctor should be made aware of:;

    • The breast tissue hurts outside of normal soreness caused by a menstrual period
    • Breast tissue puckers or dimples;
    • Itchy or scaly rash on breast;
    • Unexplained changes in breast symmetry, shape, and size;
    • Breast swelling, red, or hot to touch
    • Nipple discharge is liquid or bloody;
    • Lump spreads to armpit or collarbone
    • Lump is hard
    • Lump is painful
    • Lump is fixed to the chest wall

    Due to the high amount of treatment options for teen breast development, the survival rate is high. Teenagers are healthy enough to tolerate the most aggressive therapies used to treat breast cancer. Thats why its best to avoid high-risk lifestyle behaviors that can increase this risk. The American Cancer Society has noted that although environmental and lifestyle behaviors are not strongly associated with breast cancer, its best to avoid engaging in risky ones like smoking and consistently unhealthy diets. Other behaviors like radiation exposure to treat other diseases like leukemia or Hodgkins disease in young girls can increase the risk of breast cancer development, which takes an average of 20 years to develop.;

    Breast Cancer And Teenage Girls

    If youre a teenage girl, you might be worried about your risk of getting breast cancer.

    Developing breast cancer when youre a teenager is extremely rare. Its also uncommon in women in their 20s and 30s. The vast majority of breast cancers are diagnosed in women over the age of 50.

    There can be a lot of unreliable information and scare stories on the internet, so its important to use reputable websites or talk to your GP if youre worried about any changes to your breasts. You can also call our Helpline free on 0808 800 6000 to speak with one of our experts.

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