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When Does Breast Cancer Start Age

What Is Best For You

When to start screening for breast cancer

A key reminder: These recommendations are for screening mammograms, not diagnostic mammograms. Screening mammograms are scheduled to detect breast cancer whether or not you have a lump or other symptom. Diagnostic mammograms are scheduled after finding some possible evidence of breast cancer, such as a lump or abnormal findings from a screening mammogram. Mammograms are recommended at almost any age if a lump is found. The mammography recommendations also do not apply to all women, but are meant for women with average risk of breast cancer. Experts agree that women at especially high risk of breast cancer, such as those with mothers or sisters who had breast cancer, may want to start mammograms between the ages of 40 and 50 or in rare cases, even earlier.

The bottom line is that mammograms have the potential to help detect breast cancer earlier. However, like most medical procedures, there are risks as well as benefits. Whether to start at age 50, age 40, or earlier or later or never depends on several different factors.

For most women who are not at especially high risk of breast cancer, regular mammograms do not need to start before age 50. Or, to be cautious, a woman can get one mammogram earlier , and then if it is normal, wait until she is 50 for her next mammogram. This is the advice that the National Center for Health Research and their Cancer Prevention and Treatment Fund have been giving since 2007.

Previous Breast Cancer Or Lump

If you have previously had breast cancer or early non-invasive cancer cell changes in breast ducts, you have a higher risk of developing it again, either in your other breast or in the same breast.

A benign breast lump does not mean you have breast cancer, but certain types of breast lumps may slightly increase your risk of developing cancer.

Some benign changes in your breast tissue, such as cells growing abnormally in ducts , or abnormal cells inside your breast lobes , can make getting breast cancer more likely.

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When You Cant Find Your Family History

While many women already know if their mother, sister, or daughter have had breast cancer, you might not have this information.

If your close family members passed away at a young age, if some of them didnât have access to health care , if you were adopted, or if members of your family have been otherwise separated, you might not know which illnesses run in your family.

While family history is important information, breast cancer screenings are the most important tools for early detection, whether or not you have a family history of the disease.

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The Malm Breast Cancer Database

The study cohort consists of all cases of invasive female breast cancer in Malmö, Sweden, diagnosed between 1 January 1961 and 31 December 1991. They were all treated at the same institution, Malmö University Hospital, and no referrals were made to or from the hospital for patients with breast cancer. All residents in Sweden are registered by a unique 10-digit ID number. Breast cancer patients were identified by review of clinical notes and record-linkage with the Swedish Cancer Registry, forming the basis of the Malmö Breast Cancer Database. This was all completed by one surgeon, who also validated all breast cancer diagnoses by reviewing histological material, X-ray examinations, and medical records . The present study was approved by the regional ethical committee in Lund, Sweden .

Having Had Radiation Therapy

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month  NBC Los Angeles

Females who have had radiation therapy to the chest or breasts, such as for Hodgkin lymphoma, before the age of 30 years have a higher chance of developing breast cancer.

This risk varies with age and is highest in people who were in their teens when they had radiation treatment. According to the

A number of lifestyle factors can increase someones risk of breast cancer. Being aware of these factors can help them reduce their breast cancer risk.

These lifestyle factors include:

  • Being inactive: Physical inactivity increases a persons risk of breast cancer. Getting regular exercise may help reduce this risk.
  • Taking hormones: Some types of hormone replacement therapy and hormonal birth control may increase the risk of breast cancer. Finding nonhormonal alternatives may reduce a persons chance of developing breast cancer.
  • Being overweight after menopause: After menopause, people who are overweight are more likely to develop breast cancer. Maintaining a healthy weight may help reduce breast cancer risk.
  • Drinking alcohol: According to the

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What Is The Average American Womans Risk Of Developing Breast Cancer During Her Lifetime

Based on current incidence rates, 12.9% of women born in the United States today will develop breast cancer at some time during their lives . This estimate, from the most recent SEER Cancer Statistics Review , is based on breast cancer statistics for the years 2015 through 2017.

This estimate means that, if the current incidence rate stays the same, a woman born today has about a 1 in 8 chance of being diagnosed with breast cancer at some time during her life. On the other hand, the chance that she will never have breast cancer is 87.1%, or about 7 in 8.

For men born in the United States today, the lifetime risk of breast cancer is 0.13%, based on breast cancer statistics for the years 2015 through 2017. This means that a man born today has about a 1 in 800 chance of being diagnosed with breast cancer at some time during his life.

How Do I Mitigate My Risk Of Breast Cancer

The survival rates for breast cancer have been improving since the 1980s, thanks to earlier detection from regular mammogram screening and improvements in breast cancer treatments. When breast cancer is found at an early stage, its more easily treated and the survival rate is much higher.

The best way to detect breast cancer early is by having regular screening mammograms before you develop symptoms of breast cancer like lumps, changes to the breast, or even pain in certain instances. This is why educating women about early detection is often the main goal of breast awareness month and its associated fundraisers and campaigns.

Having regular mammograms makes it easier for a radiologist to compare your images and see changes or areas of concern over time. If you wait until you have symptoms, the breast cancer might be enlarged and more difficult to treat.

Mammography is a type of X-ray exam that takes an image of the inside of the breasts. All Mayfair Diagnostics mammography clinics use technology that provides traditional 2D images of the breast, as well as 3D images of the breast that can then be viewed in slices. This provides a greater level of detail and a clearer view of the breast tissue with a very small dose of radiation the same level of radiation as the 2D images require.

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Personal History Of Breast Disease

Females who have previously had breast cancer are at risk of developing a second breast cancer, either in the other breast or in a different part of the same breast. This is not the same as the first cancer returning.

Having a personal history of certain noncancerous breast conditions can also increase a persons risk of breast cancer. This can include conditions such as atypical hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ, and ductal carcinoma in situ.

People with a history of breast, ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer should ask their doctors about .

Guidelines For Elective Surgical Options

Mayo Clinic Explains Breast Cancer

Women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations face a significant risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Prophylactic removal of the fallopian tubes and ovaries is recommended by about age 40. Many women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations will also elect to have their breasts removed. Nipple-sparing mastectomy is an effective option for these women.

Making the decision to have an elective preventive double mastectomy and removal of the ovaries is personal and should be based on many life factors. You must balance where you are in your childbearing years, what your future choices may be, and whether you would prefer to follow a rigorous screening schedule instead of making such a life-altering choice.

Whatever your decision, we encourage you to make an informed choice. If you do elect to have a preventive double mastectomy, our breast specialists will guide you in the appropriate breast surgery reconstruction to help restore your body image after treatment.

If you are interested in discussing ovary removal surgery , we will refer you to one of our gynecological oncologists.

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Lobular Carcinoma In Situ

Lobular carcinoma in situ refers to an area of abnormal cells confined to the breasts milk-producing glands.

Because these cells do not spread to surrounding tissues, doctors do not lobular carcinoma situ to be cancer. However, it can increase the chances of developing other types of invasive breast cancer.

This condition rarely causes symptoms. Doctors lobular carcinoma in situ during a breast biopsy for another problem in the breast area. In some cases, tiny white specs of calcium called microcalcifications appear on a routine mammogram.

What Is The Average American Womans Risk Of Being Diagnosed With Breast Cancer At Different Ages

Many women are more interested in the risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer at specific ages or over specific time periods than in the risk of being diagnosed at some point during their lifetime. Estimates by decade of life are also less affected by changes in incidence and mortality rates than longer-term estimates. The SEER report estimates the risk of developing breast cancer in 10-year age intervals . According to the current report, the risk that a woman will be diagnosed with breast cancer during the next 10 years, starting at the following ages, is as follows:

  • Age 30 . . . . . . 0.49%
  • Age 60 . . . . . . 3.54%
  • Age 70 . . . . . . 4.09%

These risks are averages for the whole population. An individual womans breast cancer risk may be higher or lower depending on known factors, as well as on factors that are not yet fully understood. To calculate an individual womans estimated breast cancer risk, health professionals can use the Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool, which takes into account several known breast cancer risk factors.

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Menstrual And Reproductive History

The menstrual cycle increases levels of the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone in the body.

Starting menstrual periods at a younger age or going through menopause at a later age raises the bodys exposure to these hormones, which can increase a persons risk of breast cancer.

Those who start their menstrual period before the

to prevent miscarriage. Women who took this drug while pregnant and any children they gave birth to have a slightly higher risk of breast cancer.

Other Risk Factors For Breast Cancer

Mammogram Guidelines

Other factors that seem to increase risk include:

  • not having children or having children after the age of 30
  • early age at first period
  • later age of natural menopause
  • alcohol intake
  • obesity or gaining a lot of weight after menopause
  • using the contraceptive pill the risk is higher while taking the pill and for about ten years after stopping use
  • using hormone replacement therapy also known as hormone therapy the risk increases the longer you take it, but disappears within about two years of stopping use.

Having some of these risk factors does not mean that you will get breast cancer. Most women with breast cancer have no known risk factors, aside from getting older. More research needs to be done before we can be definite about risk factors.

In men, the main risk factor is abnormal enlargement of the breasts due to drug, chemical or hormone treatments. Men with Klinefelters syndrome can also be at risk. A mans risk increases where there is a family history of male breast cancer or a strong family history of breast cancer.

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Understanding Your Risk Of Breast Cancer

Several breast cancer risk assessment tools have been developed to help a woman estimate her chance of developing breast cancer. The best studied is the Gail model, which is available on the National Cancer Institutes website at www.cancer.gov/bcrisktool. After you enter some personal and family information, including race/ethnicity, the tool provides you with a 5-year and lifetime estimate of the risk of developing invasive breast cancer. Because it only asks for information about breast cancer in first-degree family members and does not include their ages at diagnosis, the tool works best at estimating risk in women without a strong inherited breast cancer risk. For some women, other ways of determining the risk of breast cancer may work better. For example, women with a strong family history of breast cancer risk should consider talking to a genetic counselor.

It is important to talk with your doctor about how to estimate your personal risk of breast cancer and to discuss risk-reducing or prevention options .

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What Are The Risks Of Regular Breast Screening

When deciding between the benefit of early detection of breast cancer and the potential harms associated with breast cancer screening there are two main thoughts that are often considered. The first is radiation exposure and the second is overdiagnosis.

Many women are concerned about the cumulative effects from radiation exposure during a mammogram. However, mammograms require a very small dose of radiation, less than the annual background environmental radiation exposure. Many women consider the risk of harm from this amount of radiation exposure to be low compared to the prognosis when breast cancer is detected early.

Overdiagnosis includes unnecessary treatment of cancer that would not have caused harm in a womans lifetime, as well as the physical and psychological consequences of false positives. Current research puts the risk of overdiagnosis at 10 percent, compared to research that shows not participating in screening mammography leads to a 60 percent higher chance of dying from breast cancer.

While the recommendations differ, the ultimate decision rests with women. Understanding the risks and benefits of regular mammogram screening and speaking with your doctor about your medical history is an important first step to decide whats right for you.

REFERENCES

Advani, S. M., et al. Association of Breast Density With Breast Cancer Risk Among Women Aged 65 Years or Older by Age Group and Body Mass Index.JAMA Network Open. 2021 4. Accessed September 15, 2021.

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Risk Of Breast Cancer By Age

A womans risk of developing breast cancer based on her age is as follows:

  • 30 years old: 0.49% or 1 in 204
  • 40 years old: 1.55% or 1 in 65
  • 50 years old: 2.4% or 1 in 42
  • 60 years old: 3.54% or 1 in 28
  • 70 years old: 4.09% or 1 in 24

About 5% of breast cancer cases occur in women under 40 years old. It may be more difficult to diagnose breast cancer in young women because their breast tissue is denser than that of older women. Young women and their doctors may also be more likely to ignore a breast lump because of their low risk.

Breast cancer that occurs in young women tends to be more aggressive and less likely to respond to treatment. Women who are diagnosed with breast cancer before age 40 are more likely to have a genetic mutation that puts them at higher risk. Screening for the BRCA gene mutation may begin at age 25.

Other signs for young women to be aware of include:

  • A lump in the breast
  • Nipple discharge
  • Focal pain
  • Skin changes on the breast

Mammogram screening is recommended to begin between ages 40 and 50 based on your individual risk factors.

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Side Effects And Complications

Common Types of Breast Cancer – Mayo Clinic

All treatments have some side effects that range from mild to severe. Most clear up when treatment ends, but there can be some lasting complications.

Its important to tell your oncologist about all symptoms, even if they seem minor. Your healthcare team will work with you to ease side effects and deal with complications.

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Breast Lumps In Teenagers

It can be normal to feel lumps when your breasts are developing and these often disappear on their own.

If a lump causes you any discomfort, appears to get bigger or youre worried about it, talk to someone such as your GP. You may also want to talk to someone in your family or a school nurse.

Although its very unlikely that theres anything wrong, a doctor can check it out and should put your mind at rest. You can ask to see a female doctor or the practice nurse if this will make you feel more comfortable.

Very occasionally lumps are a sign of a benign breast condition. Benign means harmless, and a benign condition will not become a breast cancer. The most common benign lump as the breasts are developing is known as a fibroadenoma.

Benefits Of Mammographic Screening

The ACS systematic review also examined the effect of screening mammography on life expectancy. Although the review concluded that there was high-quality evidence that mammographic screening increases life expectancy by decreasing breast cancer mortality, the authors were not able to estimate the size of the increase 23.

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