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Red Wine And Breast Cancer 2020

Why Do I Feel Guilty When I Drink

Alcohol can cause cancer, so why don’t most Canadians know that?

Im not sure.

Guilt comes from a different place for everyone, and its a common theme for survivors. While theres no data to support my response, Ill share what I know from my graduate studies in health psychology and personal experience.

Guilt is a negative emotion. You can feel guilty for something you DID do. You can feel guilty for something you DIDNT do.

Those of us whove been diagnosed want to live the healthiest life we can, for as long as we can.

Regarding alcohol, we know what the research says. We know what our doctors suggest. And yet, at the end of the day, sometimes we just want to ignore all of that. Ignore the fact that we were diagnosed in the first place. Have a glass of wine and forget.

But that can feel like were inviting the cancer back. And if it returns?

This time well know its our fault because we CAUSED it. And that can cause feelings of guilt.

Please remember:

Just like no one food causes cancer, neither can one alcoholic drink. Guilt is an energy sucker. Let. It. Go.

Damage To Body Tissues

Alcohol can act as an irritant, especially in the mouth and throat. Cells that are damaged by the alcohol may try to repair themselves, which could lead to DNA changes that can be a step toward cancer.

Once in the body, alcohol can be converted into acetaldehyde, a chemical that can damage the DNA inside cells and has been shown to cause cancer in lab animals.

Drinking alcohol can also lead to oxidative stress in cells, causing them to create more reactive oxygen species . These can lead to damage inside the cells that might increase the risk of cancer.

Alcohol and its byproducts can also damage the liver, leading to inflammation and scarring . As liver cells try to repair the damage, they can end up with mistakes in their DNA, which could lead to cancer.

How Much Alcohol Is Safe

Researchers vary in their definition of safe drinking when it comes to cancer. Moderate drinking is often defined as one alcoholic drink a day for women, or two a day for men. Sticking to these guidelines will keep most people clear of alcohol use disorder. But when it comes to breast cancer, could a glass of wine a day still be one too many?

This ultimately depends on the individual. If you already know that you are at high risk for breast cancer, you may want to avoid alcohol for the most part. If you dont carry many risk factors for cancer, but have a family history of heart disease, a daily drink may actually have some positive impact.

The relationship of alcohol to womens health is complex. Moderate drinking appears to increase levels of estrogen, for example. This can in turn increase breast cancer risk, especially before menopause. But this also means that alcoholic beverages which do less to boost estrogen, such as red wine, might not be so risky. And for older women, the health benefits of increased estrogen may outweigh the negatives.

The decision about how much alcohol is healthy for you depends on many factors. At the end of the day, the more you know about your personal health and your family history, the better youll be able to decide.

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Public Awareness Of Risk

A limited number of studies have examined public understanding of alcohol and breast cancer. In a study of women attending a breast screening clinic in the United Kingdom, only 19% were aware that alcohol consumption is a breast cancer risk factor.81 Among university students in a survey conducted in 23 countries around the world, overall, 3.3% were aware of alcohol consumption as a breast cancer risk factor.82 Although awareness was highest in the United States, only 10% of students correctly identified alcohol consumption as a risk factor.

Awareness tends to be greater among women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer, with resulting lower alcohol intake in that group. In a systematic review, 62% to 97% of participants adhered to recommendations to limit alcohol consumption in a study of women completing initial treatment for breast cancer.83 These studies were conducted primarily in the United States a small number of participants were in Europe. In spite of the strength of the overall evidence connecting alcohol consumption to breast cancer,5,67 there is little public awareness of alcohol consumption as a breast cancer risk factor.

How Does Alcohol Affect The Risk Of Cancer

serving red wine

Researchers have hypothesized multiple ways that alcohol may increase the risk of cancer, including

Alcoholic beverages may also contain a variety of carcinogenic contaminants that are introduced during fermentation and production, such as nitrosamines, asbestos fibers, phenols, and hydrocarbons.

The mechanisms by which alcohol consumption may decrease the risks of some cancers are not understood and may be indirect.

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Does Alcohol Raise Estrogen Levels

Yes.

Drinking alcohol increases the serum level of endogenous estrogens. Serum is the clear liquid that can be separated from clotted blood. Endogenous means produced or grown in the body.

Even drinking small amounts of alcohol, say 1.25 to 2.5 standard drinks per day raises the level of estrogen.

Why is estrogen a problem? In estrogen receptor -positive human breast cancer cells, alcohol increases ER-dependent gene expression. This results in cells being reproduced quickly and at high speed.

If you had ER-positive breast cancer, the goal now is to keep estrogen levels low. Youre likely taking medication to do that. Since alcohol raises estrogen levels, drinking can be counterproductive to that effort.

Is There A Safe Amount To Drink

There is no ‘safe’ level of alcohol drinking, but the risk of cancer is lower the less alcohol you drink.You can limit your risk by drinking no more than one standard drink a day if you are a woman and two standard drinks per day if you are a man.

  • A standard drink is:
  • ½ pint of beer, lager, cider or stout.
  • 1 measure of spirits .
  • A small glass of wine.

It is also important to give your body a break and have at least 2 alcohol-free days every week.

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Red Wine Reduces Breast Cancer Risk

Regular alcohol consumption raises breast cancer risk, except for red wine, which has the opposite effect when consumed in moderation, researchers from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles reported in the Journal of Womens Health. The authors explained that the chemicals in the seeds and skins of red grapes slightly reduce estrogen levels and raise testosterone among premenopausal females thus reducing their breast cancer risk.

The authors stress that it is the red grape that has the beneficial compounds, and not just red wine. They suggest that women should consider red wine when choosing an alcoholic beverage to consume, rather than encouraging wine over grapes.

This study contradicts in part a widespread belief that the consumption of all types of alcoholic drinks raises a womans chances of developing breast cancer, because alcohol raises estrogen levels, which in turn encourages the growth of cancer cells.

However, the researchers found that premenopausal women who consumed eight ounces of red wine every evening for approximately a month, had lower estrogen and higher testosterone levels. They tried out the same with another group of women, but they had to consume white wine it did not have the same effect.

Moderate female alcohol drinkers should perhaps reassess their choices, the authors suggested.

Study co-author, Chrisandra Shufelt, MD, wrote:

The study involved 36 premenopausal females. They were randomly selected into two groups:

Braunstein, said:

How Breast Cancer In Diagnosed

Does Red Wine Cause or Prevent Breast Cancer?

Heres a list of primary symptoms which helps to diagnose the breast cancer. Source: Cancer.org

Lump, hard knot or thinking inside the breast or underarm area.

Swelling, Warmth, Redness or Darkening of the breast.

Change in the size or shape of the breast.

Dimpling or puckering of the skin.

Itchy, Scaly sore or rash on the nipple.

Pulling in of your nipple or other parts of the breast.

Nipple discharge that starts suddenly.

New pain in the spot that does not go away.

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Alcohol Is The Breast Cancer Risk No One Wants To Talk About

    To revist this article, visit My Profile, then .

    To revist this article, visit My Profile, then .

As October ushers in National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the social media campaign Drink Less for Your Breasts stands out like a red flag against a cheerful tide of pink ribbons, especially the ones printed on labels of alcoholic beverages. This is the time of year when some craft brewers tint their beer pink, and rosé bottles and cocktail menus display the iconic ribbon, touting companies donations to breast cancer organizations. Drink Less for Your Breasts reminds women that alcohol actually contributes to breast cancer risk.

The social media campaign, which just relaunched after its debut in February, targets young women and appears to be the first of its kind in the US. One video, featured in a Facebook ad, shows a young woman dancing in a nightclub with a cocktail in her hand. She smiles as she heads for the restroom to take a break, but when she looks in the mirror, instead of her bouncy dark curls, she sees a somber, bald version of herself with an IV pole and drip bag. Horrified, she reaches up to touch her hair as her reflection reaches through the mirror and puts her hand over the cocktail glass. Alcohol increases your risk of breast cancer, a female announcer intones. Drink less for your breasts.

Women need to know this, says LoConte. They need to make choices with the right information.

One In Four New Breast Cancers And One In Five Colon Cancers In Canada Attributed To Alcohol

Date:
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Summary:
A new study has found an association between alcohol and a substantially higher risk of several forms of cancer, including breast, colon, and oral cancers. Increased risk was evident even among light to moderate drinkers , who represented 1 in 7 of all new cancers in 2020 and more than 100,000 cases worldwide.

A new study from the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer , published in the journal Lancet Oncology, has found an association between alcohol and a substantially higher risk of several forms of cancer, including breast, colon, and oral cancers. Increased risk was evident even among light to moderate drinkers , who represented 1 in 7 of all new cancers in 2020 and more than 100,000 cases worldwide.

In Canada, alcohol use was linked to 7,000 new cases of cancer in 2020, including 24 per cent of breast cancer cases, 20 per cent of colon cancers, 15 per cent of rectal cancers, and 13 per cent of oral and liver cancers.

“All drinking involves risk,” said study co-author Dr. Jürgen Rehm, Senior Scientist, Institute for Mental Health Policy Research and Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute at CAMH. “And with alcohol-related cancers, all levels of consumption are associated with some risk. For example, each standard sized glass of wine per day is associated with a 6 per cent higher risk for developing female breast cancer.”

Story Source:

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New Who Study Links Moderate Alcohol Use With Higher Cancer Risk

One in four new breast cancers and one in five colon cancers in Canada attributed to alcohol

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

image: Alcohol drinking caused nearly 7,000 cases of cancer in Canada in 2020. Breast cancer made up almost 1 in 4 of the new cases attributable to alcohol.view more

July 14, 2021 A new study from the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer , published in the journal Lancet Oncology, has found an association between alcohol and a substantially higher risk of several forms of cancer, including breast, colon, and oral cancers. Increased risk was evident even among light to moderate drinkers , who represented 1 in 7 of all new cancers in 2020 and more than 100,000 cases worldwide.

In Canada, alcohol use was linked to 7,000 new cases of cancer in 2020, including 24 per cent of breast cancer cases, 20 per cent of colon cancers, 15 per cent of rectal cancers, and 13 per cent of oral and liver cancers.

“All drinking involves risk,” said study co-author Dr. Jürgen Rehm, Senior Scientist, Institute for Mental Health Policy Research and Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute at CAMH. “And with alcohol-related cancers, all levels of consumption are associated with some risk. For example, each standard sized glass of wine per day is associated with a 6 per cent higher risk for developing female breast cancer.”

Journal

The Lancet Oncology

Media Contact

Does The Amount Of Alcohol Make A Difference

13 Facts About Cancer You May Not Know

In general, studies have found that the more you drink regularly over time, the higher your chances of having breast cancer. If youâre a woman and you have three drinks per week, your odds are 15% higher than a woman who doesnât drink at all. And this risk goes up an estimated 10% for each extra drink per week.

But what exactly is a drink? In the U.S., a âstandardâ drink is defined as about 14 grams of alcohol. This is equal to:

  • 1.5 ounces of liquor
  • 5 ounces of wine
  • 12 ounces of beer

But everyone is different. Your individual risk may be higher or lower because of your genes, your race, if youâve ever been pregnant, if youâve been exposed to chemicals, and many other things.

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How To Prevent Alcohol

Alcohol is classified as a Group 1 human carcinogen by IARC. It is causally linked to 7 types of cancer. Besides female breast cancer, it increases the risk of developing oral cavity , pharynx , oesophagus , liver, larynx and colorectum cancers.

There is no safe level of alcohol consumption. The risk of breast cancer increases with each unit of alcohol consumed per day. More than 10% of alcohol-attributable cancer cases in the Region arise from drinking just 1 bottle of beer or 2 small glasses of wine every day. For breast cancer, this is even higher: 1 in 4 alcohol-attributable breast cancer cases in the Region is caused by this amount.

Simply put, alcohol is toxic. It harms every organ while it passes through the body, says Dr Carina Ferreira-Borges, Acting Director for Noncommunicable Diseases and Programme Manager for Alcohol and Illicit Drugs at WHO/Europe. So, it makes perfect sense to limit the amount of consumed alcohol, to find ways to replace alcohol with other beverages and to adopt nationwide policies that help to reduce alcohol consumption.

Avoid Triggers And Find Alternatives

If certain people, places, or situations trigger the urge to drink, avoiding those things may help a person avoid drinking or limit their alcohol consumption.

It is also important to find healthy ways to cope with feelings that may push someone to drink, which may include:

  • boredom
  • stress
  • anxiety

Investing more time in hobbies, activities, or relationships that do not involve drinking may help someone fill their time and find a sense of fulfillment outside of situations that involve alcohol.

People who enjoy the taste of alcoholic beverages may find it helpful to explore alcohol-free alternatives, such as:

  • alcohol-free soft seltzer
  • mocktails

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How Alcohol Is Linked To Breast Cancer

Alcohol use has been linked to seven types of cancer, including the kind that affects breast tissue. Back in 1988, the International Agency for Research on Cancer IDd alcohol as a carcinogen or a substance that causes cancer.

Weve known that alcohol is a major influence on cancer risk for a really long time, says Blair Washington, M.D., M.H.A., a physician editor at MCG Health and a clinical assistant professor of gynecology at the University of Washington. But, exactly how alcohol affects your risk for breast cancer isnt really understood, she adds.

Still, experts suspect there are several ways alcohol can cause harm to breast tissue:

How Did The Study Classify The Levels Of Drinking

Women who are moderate drinkers have increased risk of cancer, studies say l GMA

The different levels of drinking were defined by the daily amount of alcohol consumption per day in grams these are grams of pure alcohol, not grams of alcoholic drink:

  • Moderate drinking: 0.1 to 20 grams of alcohol per day, the equivalent of up to 2 alcoholic drinks.
  • Risky drinking: 20 to 60g per day, between 2 and 6 alcoholic drinks.
  • Heavy drinking: more than 60g per day, more than 6 alcoholic drinks.

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